JACKSON - Bowhunters can expect a difficult opening weekend for deer and elk, thanks largely to hot and dry weather and a thick forest full of vegetation. Those lucky enough to get an animal need to get it out of the woods quickly to avoid spoiling. Elk will be at high elevations. Deer also are at high elevations, and their numbers are higher than last year. Expect success later this month.

JACKSON - Bowhunters can expect a difficult opening weekend for deer and elk, thanks largely to hot and dry weather and a thick forest full of vegetation. Those lucky enough to get an animal need to get it out of the woods quickly to avoid spoiling. Elk will be at high elevations. Deer also are at high elevations, and their numbers are higher than last year. Expect success later this month.

Bowhunters need to remember that only buck deer having not less than a forked antler can be taken within Jackson, Josephine and Curry counties.

Upland game-bird numbers are lower than average across the board, but hunters can expect to find birds. Forest grouse can be found along creeks with heavy riparian areas and look for mountain quail around brushy clear-cuts near water sources.

Remember, all heads of hunter-killed bears must be checked in at Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife offices. Keep heads unfrozen.

Predator calling has become one of the best methods for hunters targeting cougars. Locate major ridge lines and rocky out-croppings as areas of travel within cougar home range. Hunters are reminded that they must bring their cougar into an ODFW office within 10 days to be checked and tagged.

DOUGLAS - Bowhunting for deer and elk should be average for the opening weekend, which starts Saturday with warm and dry weather expected.

Western gray squirrel hunting opens Saturday, with hunters expecting an average year. Check for squirrels around oak and conifer stands.

Upland game-bird hunting opens Monday, with most summer brood-chick counts down from average. Forest grouse hunting should be good, with early success for blue grouse expected to be in the mid- to high-elevation areas of the Cascades.

KLAMATH - Bowhunters can expect only a fair season on deer due to poor fawn survival. Due to extreme fire danger, only landowners now have access to private forestlands in northern Klamath County west of Highway 97 between Gilchrist and La Pine.