The "Backers express doubts"" headline on a Washington Post lead story was a biased distortion and example of media misleading readers. Story led and ended quoting one disgruntled male delegate still supporting Hillary. Of seven women interviewed, two still "express doubts," but five switched to Obama.

The "Backers express doubts"¦" headline on a Washington Post lead story was a biased distortion and example of media misleading readers. Story led and ended quoting one disgruntled male delegate still supporting Hillary. Of seven women interviewed, two still "express doubts," but five switched to Obama.

You know readers scan headlines better than they read stories. Using phony conflict headlines promotes sensational dishonesty at the expense of media integrity and accuracy. You should do better. — G. Myers, Jacksonville

Since the movie "Bucket List" came out, terminally ill people like myself have embraced the term. A bucket list is a list of things we wish to do before we die.

Chris Conrad's use of bucket list in his "Night Crawler" column (Aug. 22), referring to turning 30, was inappropriate, insensitive, uncalled for, disrespectful and downright hurtful to those of us who have real bucket lists. If you are, know someone who is or have lost someone to terminal illness, please vent your displeasure to the Mail Tribune. Call, write or e-mail the editor, Tempo editor and the lounge lizard himself.

I am two years into a 2-percent, five-year survival rate for stage 4 metastatic bladder cancer. I have a bucket list. I am offended. And I bet you won't print this. Losers. — Philip Roberts, Medford

Several days back a letter was published extolling the virtues of capitalism. I would remind us all of some of the historical benefits of capitalism: children laboring in the mills and coal mines, company towns and stores which made the workers virtual slaves.

Capitalism, as with any "ism," can be abused and must be regulated to protect the public from abusive and predatory tactics. Don't forget Enron. — V. Handel, Medford

Last month there was an issue raised by Jacksonville residents who said they did not appreciate the trucks traveling through their town.

I was in one of those trucks. We all had a job to do, which is much appreciated. The companies involved employed us to continue the project — the Medford Sports Park. We were all excited to be working again and to be a part of a project to help the Rogue Valley's hurting economy. The sports park gives benefits to so many sports-minded people all over the West and to the many employees alike.

Why would the people of Jacksonville have such disdain for something positive? The inconvenience of a few for a very temporary period of time is not too much to ask. I personally felt the rude gestures made by residents to us as professionals were unnecessary.

As a resident of Jackson County for many years, I encourage this kind of development. It has made it possible for me to continue to live here in this beautiful valley. — Bruce Little, Phoenix

On Aug. 16, as I turned left off Modoc onto McAndrews, I encountered a pile of broken glass which appeared to be a mixture of white and dark glass from beer and wine bottles. Had I not carefully avoided turning into the mess, I could have easily gotten glass in my tires. My question is why certain idiots — who may be inebriated — care so little about others whose automobile tires they may damage?

From the smallest car tire to the largest truck tire, it requires dollars and dollars to replace a tire damaged by this pile of sharp junk.

Your comment on this would be welcome. — Vinton Snyder, Medford

Regarding the Friday, Aug. 22 article, Judge Ron Grensky, Jackson County Circuit Court Judge sentencing Reyes-Real to 20 years, Reyes' brother and Laris, to two years each, "Sentence sends message about gang violence."

This sentence and others like it are the only way to convince gang members that their actions will not be tolerated. Sentencing is perhaps all they will ever understand. Thank you Judge Grensky! — R.E. Sparks, Eagle Point