A forum of 17 Rogue Valley photographers, working in both film and digital imagines, will stage a show of their works during the First Friday art walk Nov. 7 in Ashland.

A forum of 17 Rogue Valley photographers, working in both film and digital imagines, will stage a show of their works during the First Friday art walk Nov. 7 in Ashland.

Most are still-life studies of nature or architecture and some are by internationally renowned photo-artists. The show, staged by the Southern Oregon Photographers Forum, is at Studio 5, above the Rogue Valley Metaphysical Library on A Street. A reception for the artists will be from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday.

SOPF organized almost two years ago and members meet monthly to trade tips and experiences "as each one works toward perfecting the craft, as well as communicating a view that connects on some emotional level," says the show's organizer, Geri Mathewson.

Mathewson's show piece is called "Arizona Wall" and depicts an intersecting curved wall with a highly textured flat wall, all baking in the hot Southwest sun.

Mathewson and other photographers find Emigrant Lake an inviting subject. She has many shots of its rocky spine juxtaposed with the smoothness of new snow.

David Lorenz Winston, whose gallery is hosting the event, uses Emigrant Lake as a backdrop for his picture of a shotgun-riddled highway sign. In the real world, the two parts of his image are an hour apart, the sign being in Siskiyou County, but Winston and most other photographers give themselves artistic latitude to shape their shots with PhotoShop software.

Noted film photographer John Wimberly will offer a black-and-white image of a yucca cactus against a desert wall. Called "Bitter Ridge," it's a framed 11-by-14-inch gelatin-silver print.

Wimberly, who focuses on photographs of Native American petroglyphs, displayed his work in the 1980s at two California shows featuring the legendary Ansel Adams.

Outdoor photographer Sean Bagshaw will offer his "Bear Hat Mountain," shot in Glacier National Park on an otherwise gray and dreary day.

"We hiked in to photograph the mountain and the lake and as we were packing to leave at sunset, it shot a magenta streak and changed everything entirely," says Bagshaw.

The photographers are "pretty excited at offering a fresh look at where photography is going, with a really interesting variety of imagery," says Bagshaw.

Wimberly notes that he prefers old-fashioned film because "I love the way film represents the world, and I don't think black-and-white, done digitally, with ink on paper can approach the gelatin-silver medium.

"This show is presenting a talented group of photographers with a diverse group of images reflecting many approaches to the medium," he adds.

Other photographers, all from the Rogue Valley, include Darlene Lyon Kruse, Julie Young, Dane Roubos, Steve Addington, Teri Dixon, Tom Glassman, Barbara Bruckman, Diana Standing, Vitaly Geyman, John Bruckman, Kate Geary and Helene Feiner.

Call 973-8920 or 482-7240 for more information.