Do you have an urge to expand your cycling awareness or knowledge base? Whether you are just getting into bicycling or have been an avid cyclist for years, you may want to learn about bicycle maintenance, find new gear or develop training regimens to improve your speed or performance in a cycling event.

Do you have an urge to expand your cycling awareness or knowledge base? Whether you are just getting into bicycling or have been an avid cyclist for years, you may want to learn about bicycle maintenance, find new gear or develop training regimens to improve your speed or performance in a cycling event.

The Internet offers a world of knowledge on just about everything related to bicycling. Web sites also allow you to follow activities in the pro racing circuit and find future cycling events to ride.

Finding cycling-related information on the Internet is pretty easy. Just click on your browser, type in a search word or phrase and, voilá, all kinds of sources are at your fingertips.

I know that most cyclists would rather spend their valuable time on their bikes than staring at a computer monitor for hours on end. So I'll save you some time in getting started in the world of cyber-cycling.

Let's begin with local information. The two best sources for cycling information in the Rogue Valley are the Siskiyou Velo Web site (www.siskiyouvelo.org), oriented mostly for roadies, and the Southern Oregon Mountain Biking Association Web site (www.somba.org), providing information for mountain bikers. Both of these sites provide a wealth of information, including schedules for club rides, cycling events, maps and directions for finding riding routes and trails, advocacy contacts, newsletters and membership application forms.

If you are interested in one-day cycling events or weeklong touring for group rides in Oregon, look on the Oregon ride calendar at www.bikingbis.com/blog/_WebPages/OregonRideCalendar.html. This page lists monthly bicycle activities in Oregon, as well as other rides in the Pacific Northwest. Another good link for Northwest cycling events is http://home.comcast.net/~eeyman/cycle-links-pnw.html. If you want to travel farther to participate in organized rides or events, check out www.bikeride.com, which covers organized rides in the entire United States and Canada.

If you need help repairing your bicycle, such as adjusting shifters and derailleurs, or changing a tire, go to www.parktool.com/repair or www.sheldonbrown.com/repair. You will find detailed information and pictures describing how to complete most routine bicycle maintenance and repairs.

When Lance Armstrong won his string of victories at the Tour de France, a lot of American cyclists got interested in professional bicycle racing and now like to keep up with what is going on in the pro cycling world. If you are a pro cycling fan, then you should bookmark www.velonews.com and www.cyclingnews.com. Both of these Web sites feature cycling news, stories about the professional riders and their teams and information on all the pro races. Pro Cycling News (www.dailypeloton.com) is another good source for professional cycling information.

Like a lot of avid cyclists, I'm always looking at new equipment, the latest cycling technology, cycling clothing and other bicycling-related gadgets. Although there are plenty of bicycle shops in the Rogue Valley, none can carry an inventory comparable to the diversity of equipment you can find on the Internet. It's a good idea to bookmark a couple of these sites just to see what's available and to compare price, quality and specifications. If a local shop can't special-order your item, you can surely find it on the Internet. My favorite book marks are: Performance Bike, (www.performancebike.com), Bike Nashbar (www.nashbar.com), Colorado Cyclist (www.coloradocyclist.com), and Oregon's Bike Tires Direct (www.biketiresdirect.com).

Women should check out Team Estrogen (www.teamestrogen.com) for female-specific bicycle clothing and equipment.

All cyclists should think about becoming an advocate for bicycling, at least in the local community. That's how we gain consideration in city and county land-use planning, and better cycling infrastructure like bike lanes, bike racks and bike paths. These sites can help you get involved in bettering cycling in your community: League of American Bicyclists (www.bikeleague.org) and the Bicycle Transportation Alliance (www.bta4bikes.org). These sites also provide bicycle education and bicycle legal information.

I have barely scratched the surface of cycling-related information on the Internet. Many sites deal with training, sports drinks and energy food, cycling injuries and care, bicycle manufacturers and bicycle-handling techniques. Just hit that search button on your favorite browser and expand your cycling knowledge. But be careful. Don't let it sabotage your time out on the roads or trails.

Bicycling enthusiast Bob Korfhage of Phoenix is a former president of Siskiyou Velo bicycle club.