The war on drugs — we've been there, done that years ago! It was called prohibition. PBS characterized it thus:

The war on drugs — we've been there, done that years ago! It was called prohibition. PBS characterized it thus:

A. It began with most believing it was a good idea.

B. It became increasingly violent.

C. It was eventually repealed as a bad idea.

D. Alcohol consumption did increase, but insignificantly.

E. It established the Mafia financially in this country!

Sound familiar?

I once saw a DEA agent interviewed on TV after he'd seized a drug-laden Lear jet. The interviewer asked if he was elated. His reply: "So what! So what! These people make so much money, this means nothing!"

Am I suggesting drug abuse is acceptable? Of course not! The best description I've heard of drug abuse (alcohol included) is it's a slow form of suicide.

But, what aware adults do to themselves ultimately concerns just them and God. Acts are criminal only if they infringe on others' legitimate rights. Moreover, we don't elect representatives to function as our parents — they're obviously unqualified for that role.

Drug illegality is about one thing: huge profits. This war hasn't stopped drug use but has created a requirement for ever more prisons.

So, why do we allow this idiocy to continue? — Hartley Anderson, Medford

The elevation of the Phoenix-based neo-Nazi group (April 22) to front-page status was highly questionable, rekindling the offensive memories (and fears) of Medford as a "sun-downer" town with a history of KKK activity.

While the article was informative and a worthwhile reminder of the darker side of life in the Rogue Valley, its prominence was disconcerting. Generally, the editors of the Mail Tribune finesse the lead stories with greater sensitivity This one was disappointing. — R.T. Miller, Medford

I was surprised by your "scientific" explanation of the weather forecasts of, for example, 20 percent chance of rain. I have always thought that that meant there was a one in five chance that rain would occur sometime on whatever day the forecaster was referring to.

Your statement that it means that rain will fall on 20 percent of the days with those atmospheric conditions doesn't make sense to me. We wouldn't know which days the forecaster was talking about, would we? Besides that, those at the University of Washington had some funny understanding of the term too. I think somebody needs to go back to the February 2009 Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society! — Mary A. Delsman, Ashland

I bet no one on the Jackson County Budget Committee is a working stiff. Did they consider the following:

Businesses are closing, people are losing jobs, schools are closing, charities are inundated, people are losing homes/apartments and the county will receive less tax money.

Where is the good news that justifies another raise? C.W. just got a $20,000 raise and others raises also, and now they want more?

How many people did they lay off to meet the numbers? Because these people are not entrenched they can't care less what we think.

Wall Street greed is alive and well in Jackson County.

I feel we have a right to form our own committee on taxes, like their Budget Committee. Since property values are way down, so our property taxes should go down, say 20 percent. This would only be fair for it would reflect our cost of living. They say they need more money; so do we. This would stimulate the economy.

Do you feel any safer or better off because of what they do? I don't. — A. Pedersen, Central Point