I heartily agree with Dr. David Gilmour (guest opinion, June 9) that "health care in America is expensive." But it's frustrating to see him recycle the urban myths that (1) health plans aren't scrutinized, and (2) the overhead costs are 30-40 percent.

I heartily agree with Dr. David Gilmour (guest opinion, June 9) that "health care in America is expensive." But it's frustrating to see him recycle the urban myths that (1) health plans aren't scrutinized, and (2) the overhead costs are 30-40 percent.

Our operating costs were 8.4 percent last year and we paid more than 90 cents of each premium dollar for members' medical claims. Our profit was one-half cent on the dollar.

Anyone can find such information about the state's eight largest health plans in "Health Insurance In Oregon, 2009," at dcbs.gov. And by the way, the three largest are nonprofit, including Regence.

Scrutiny abounds: Experts say 5 percent of the premium dollar is spent on complying with at least 17 areas of state and federal regulation.

I look forward to health-care reform that makes our system simpler and more affordable and covers everyone. But real reform must be based on fact, not myth. — Jeff Kapple, Medford Regional Sales Office, senior sales executive, Regence BlueCross BlueShield

I am a 13-year-old who goes to Hedrick Middle School. It has disappointed me that the city of Medford has taken out the Holmes Park Frisbee golf course.

My friends and I used to play just about every day, but now we cannot play and enjoy each other's company. We were a very tight group of individuals, but now we have lost something we really enjoyed doing with each other.

I live right across the street form where the course was, and my friends live no more than two blocks away. Please relocate the Frisbee golf park back to where it originally was. — Eric Wallan, Medford

I have been concerned about the Women in Black who used to stand in silence at Vogel Park holding signs for peace and bringing home our soldiers "now."

They said more with their unique brand of protest against the Bush administration than all the liberals on TV howling their rage and hatred combined. Was this possibly because they became the darlings of the local media and seemed to haunt the pages of the Tribune, as well as the local news programs on TV?

They stood out there in the broiling heat or pouring rain and appeared to really care about our beloved troops. Then suddenly they were gone with the wind ... or presidential election, actually. "Poof!"

I noticed no more Ladies in Black. I have been worried about them. Were they abducted by aliens? Were they perhaps kidnapped by the infamous Republican attack machine, oh my? Perhaps taken in the darkness of night by a roving band of O'Reilly watchers?

Or did the continuation and "escalation" of the war suddenly become OK with them? Was this sudden change of heart, in all reality, due to the change of administrations in Washington, D.C.? I wonder what percentage of them were Democrats? — F.W. Janes, Medford