It took approximately six months for a moment that lasted less than two minutes.

It took approximately six months for a moment that lasted less than two minutes.

Mike Wilson, a 26-year-old Central Point resident, began his professional boxing career by knocking out journeyman Marvin Hunt only 1:59 into the first round Saturday night in a match in Tunica, Miss.

"I caught him with a beautiful right hand (punch) and made an early night out of it," Wilson said. "Like in baseball, when you hit that home run ball, you just feel it right away. That was the same thing. As soon as I hit him with the right hand, I knew it was done."

Wilson said he began the fight trying to feel out Hunt, who was the initial aggressor. The two were able to "mix it up pretty good" before Wilson landed a couple of good punches, he said. With Hunt ailing, Wilson struck quickly after the two were reset and Hunt was knocked to the mat, unable to stand up within 10 seconds to end the bout.

"Fighting is sometimes the easiest part," Wilson said of his sport. "That's what I guess all the sparring is for."

However, as quickly as his first victory came, Wilson's first match was a long time coming.

After turning professional in late February, Wilson had two matches cancelled before Saturday night, when his was the first fight on the card. And as it turns out, his next fight — and the one after — might not be far away.

Wilson said he will talk with the promoters of Prize Fight Boxing, which hosted the event, before flying home this morning. Prize Fight is promoting a pair of fights in early October that Wilson will be in discussion about participating in.

The first is Oct. 3 in Memphis, Tenn., before he would return to Tunica on Oct. 6, a quick turnaround in the fighting community.

"I want to finish out the year with five or six fights," Wilson said.

That number shouldn't be trouble for the former amateur standout. Wilson won two U.S. Championships and an estimated 120 fights (out of 160) before deciding several months ago to turn pro.

After one bout, it seems to have paid off.

"It's like going from a boy to a man when you put those gloves on," he said. "I felt real sharp in there. I felt great."

Reach reporter Shawn Miller at 776-4469, or e-mail smiller@mailtribune.com