Genealogy is a passion, not merely a pastime, as shown in your timely story on the Family History Library of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, located in Salt Lake City.

Genealogy is a passion, not merely a pastime, as shown in your timely story on the Family History Library of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, located in Salt Lake City.

I was interested in your coverage of the upcoming meetings in April, which may well attract the biggest gathering ever of ancestry researchers. Your readers may be interested to find that there are two local Family History Centers located in Southern Oregon, providing direct connection to the Salt Lake City collection of data. These centers, providing free help to anyone who wants to learn how to find ancestors, are located in Medford (2900 Juanipero Way) and Central Point (2305 Taylor Blvd.). These centers use the latest in computers and research programs, and are staffed by knowledgeable genealogical consultants six days a week. Anyone wishing to learn more about their family trees should call for times: 541-773-3363 in Medford, or 541-664-5356 in Central Point. — Richard Robertson, Medford

Finally the frustration of a huge undeniable political loss has brought out the essence of the tea partiers as revealed by the oft-repeated "N" word at last weekend's protests in Washington, D.C. Some other choice words were hurled at openly gay Rep. Barney Frank.

I have watched as hate-filled, redneck cops released attack dogs and fired water cannons at black marchers in Birmingham, Ala., where I grew up. I heard the jokes designed to keep blacks in a less than human status. I heard the lynching stories gleefully repeated by white Southern bigots.

History tells us that these tactics were similarly employed by the Nazis against Jews and other undesirables in World War II. And we all know the outcome of that movement.

It is time for our society to stand together and show that ignorance and hate simply have no place here. Tea partiers, grow up or shut up. — Christopher Lewis, Rogue River

Hmm, I'm a bit confused. Tuesday's headline in the MT blared that Walden says the health plan is "too expensive." Was he referring to the just passed health care overhaul bill or his own congressional Cadillac plan? C'mon, Greg, all we want is what you have! — Rick Ukena, Ashland

I applaud the Senate Banking Committee for voting to move a financial reform package to the Senate floor this past Monday.

The Wall Street banks were reckless, making bets with our money and costing us millions of jobs and lost savings. We bailed them out, and they used that money to give executives bonuses and to fight against reform. We need to hold big banks accountable. Sen. Merkley and Sen. Wyden need to keep the regulations in this bill strong to prevent Wall Street from gambling America's savings away. — Lauren Siegel, Ashland

A few years less than 2,000 years ago, a teacher and minister of uncertain color from Nazareth was brought to trial in Jerusalem for blasphemy, for stirring up a rebellion the punishment for which was death. (Matthew 26: 65-67) "Then did they spit in his face and buffeted him; and others smote him with the palms of their hands."

On Sunday, March 21, 2010, a week before Palm Sunday, I watched, first with dismay and consternation and then in horror, as our elected representatives, as they walked into the Capitol to fulfill their required duties, were spat upon for taking a stand on an issue of vital need for every citizen, namely a guaranteed equality of health care.

What further horrified me was that the crowd members who "spit" had brought their children along to watch how those who differ not only in thought but in color, gender or sexual choice should also be treated and otherwise bullied.

What has our country come to? — Audrey Sochor, Medford