I found Sunday's front page story distasteful. It concerned a local teenage runaway and her father's efforts to locate her.

I found Sunday's front page story distasteful. It concerned a local teenage runaway and her father's efforts to locate her.

On the surface the article appeared to be about troubled teens and how to help them, but it went on and on and on in sensationalized detail about this particular young woman's personal problems. Among other things, information was given about her medical diagnosis and treatment, her history of self-mutilation, and sexual abuse she allegedly endured.

Because she has not yet been located, she couldn't have consented to having any of this released for public consumption. I understand that her father (with whom I sympathize) and a counselor volunteered the information, but even a 15-year-old is entitled to a certain degree of personal privacy.

If police need help finding her, then all the public needs to know is her physical description and where she's been seen. We seem to live in a society where everyone thinks they have the right to know everything about everybody, but did it occur to anyone at the Tribune that by exploiting this girl and her father, she could end up more damaged than she already is? — Anthony Nelson, Ashland

Sheriff Mike Winters is doing an absolutely fantastic job! This fact is confirmed by us, the voters, re-electing him.

Reading between the lines of a letter such as the one from Ron James of Jacksonville, gives further support that he is doing what we, the majority, of voters want him to do. Keep up the good work! — Jim Bennett, Eagle Point

Recently a Republican berated President Obama for not doing enough to combat the Gulf oil crisis while another accused him of overdoing it in getting the $20 billion commitment from BP to compensate those who are going to be the big losers. This was followed by another who accused him of using the crisis for political advantage.

While these accusations appear to be inconsistent, they do have a common goal that has nothing to do with the welfare of the country. Get Obama! — Harlan Moore, Medford

It's not a "question of fairness" regarding the bail for Brad Gutches (Our View, June 20). Ken Gutches should have read the documents before putting his and the family member's money up as bail for a criminal son.

Too many people cry "foul" when they don't get what they want and blame others for their own bad judgments. Not reading a legal document can cost you a lot of trouble and money. Just ask the people who took out loans — without reading the documents — for homes they could never afford. Now it's not their fault they're losing their homes and expect the rest of us to bail them out.

The first rule of thumb when it comes to putting up money is read the "fine print" and make certain you know and understand exactly what you're doing. Brad Gutches was not a young choir boy, never in any trouble. He was a criminal. Bail funds should not be refunded to Ken just because he didn't read the documents. — P. Moran, Medford