The owners of Lemolo Lake Resort in the high Cascades are suing state and federal agencies, claiming efforts to control toxic algae blooms in nearby Diamond Lake shifted the problem to Lemolo Lake, causing them to lose business.

The owners of Lemolo Lake Resort in the high Cascades are suing state and federal agencies, claiming efforts to control toxic algae blooms in Diamond Lake shifted the problem to Lemolo Lake, causing them to lose business.

The Roseburg News-Review reports Scott and Dianna Lamb want $2 million to make up for lost business and $5 million to restore Lemolo Lake. The Lambs filed the suit in U.S. District Court in Medford.

Their lawsuit blames the U.S. Forest Service and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife for failing to install screens to keep tui chub, a small fish blamed for triggering the algae blooms, from moving into Lemolo lake when they were killed off in Diamond Lake four years ago.

Larry Cooper, southwest regional manager for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, told the Roseburg newspaper that officials decided not to install a screen because ice flows would have made traps inoperable.

He said algae blooms, including those recently found in Diamond Lake, have more to do with water management and changing water levels than tui chub.

The health department warns that if the public is exposed, the toxins may lead to difficulty breathing or heart problems, and may cause skin irritation, weakness, diarrhea, nausea, cramps or fainting.

— The News-Review, Roseburg