We're living examples of the truth that Americans can't remember their history. Daylight Savings Time used to end in late October. Now we fall back some time in November. Did that start last year or the year before?

We're living examples of the truth that Americans can't remember their history. Daylight Savings Time used to end in late October. Now we fall back some time in November. Did that start last year or the year before?

— D.M., Talent

Well, D.M., we strongly advise you to get an Internet connection. That way you can do what we do. Before asking a question that advertises the short-term nature of our attention spans or the inferiority of the public school system we attended, we Google it and save ourselves from those infuriating eye rolls by people who don't realize there's no such thing as a stupid question ... only stupid answers.

We mention this because the answer to your last question is neither. We didn't start falling back later last year or the year before. It happened the year before that.

Starting in 2007, Daylight Savings Time was extended until the first Sunday in November, which this year falls on Nov. 7 (next Sunday). Prior to 2007, we rolled the clocks back one hour on the last Sunday in October.

Last year, the first Sunday in November fell on Nov. 1, which means we're a whole week behind last year ... or does that make us a week ahead?

Excuse us while we ask the mysterious Mrs. Google how we can find the answer to that one.

And while we're at it, we'll ask her why they can't just pick a time they like and leave the dang clocks alone.

Now that would be a welcome change.