I am an ardent recycler, and I have a large amount of old fabric from curtains I have replaced. It is such a large amount of fabric I haven't been able to bring myself to throw it away, even though it is too worn to make anything from it. Is there a company that uses old fabric for paper or something?

I am an ardent recycler, and I have a large amount of old fabric from curtains I have replaced. It is such a large amount of fabric I haven't been able to bring myself to throw it away, even though it is too worn to make anything from it. Is there a company that uses old fabric for paper or something?

— Liz N., via e-mail

If you're the artsy type, a simple Google search will tell you how to recycle old drapery into everything from table runners and coasters to rag rugs, hair bands and pillow stuffing.

(A Google search also revealed that Grey's Paper Recycling Industries Ltd. in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, does, in fact, accept and recycle fabric into paper. Interesting.)

Goodwill and The Salvation Army are the only two local entities that save worn materials from the landfill, according to several local crafters, as well as staff at Craft Warehouse and Jo-Ann Fabric and Craft Store.

A salesperson at Craft Warehouse recommended checking with local quilting guilds, who may accept fabric if it's 100 percent cotton.

The Materials Girls, a Shady Cove quilting group, found a unique way to dispose of their oodles of scraps.

"We fill up pillow cases with them and give them to animal places," said club member Cornell Hartford in an e-mail.

Over the years, the group has given these makeshift beds to the Humane Society, Dogs for the Deaf and All Creatures Animal Hospital in Eagle Point.

If you're headed north for the holidays, you might consider the Material Exchange Center for Creative Arts (or MECCA) in Eugene, which accepts textiles as space allows. See www.materials-exchange.org.