Snow, (too much, too little), rain, drought, tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, fires, earthquakes, etcetera to the 10th power. It is wearying, even if just a political cartoon, to have virtually every catastrophic event attributed to global warming.

Snow, (too much, too little), rain, drought, tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, fires, earthquakes, etcetera to the 10th power. It is wearying, even if just a political cartoon, to have virtually every catastrophic event attributed to global warming.

Concern about the impact of human activity on our planet and its atmosphere is justifiable, but the science is inexact at best. Such claims need to be verifiable to be honest and legitimate. Constant unsupportable assertions don't advance the cause. — Bob Calhoun, Eagle Point

When I was a kid, summers were heaven because I could spend hours at our community pool. I learned to race and do water ballet and to dive there. I've only lived here for 24 years, and not in Medford, but as an "outsider" with no dog in the race, here's my view of the Hawthorne Park and pool conundrum.

I heard early on that placing the freeway off-ramps north and south of Medford had a great deal to do with the then-decline of the downtown area. It physically also divides east Medford from west. But Medford is still one town with businesses on both sides of the freeway.

When I first moved to the valley, downtown looked drab and like it was just hangin' on. I'm in downtown Medford quite often and have witnessed MURA as a major force in changing it into an area with charm and a future. Now MURA is calling for ways to spend several million dollars and it seems clear as day that a chunk of that money could build a new community pool and do some major landscaping to clean up Hawthorne Park. The kids, young and old, will love it. — Gail Beason, Talent

Carson Allen suggests a teen who doesn't want to tell her parents she's pregnant should abort. Notice the "solution": kill the baby. When circumstances are difficult, kill.

Mr. Allen attempts to justify his position with "It's your body ... your choice!" Does this common mantra make moral sense?

Consider a baby who can't drink formula. Can her mother refuse to breast feed her, thus letting the infant starve to death because "it's her body, her choice?" Can you refuse to care for your toddler, when she needs grave assistance at 3 a.m. because it's "your body, your choice?"

Melissa Rowland was pregnant with twins whose lives could've been saved with a Cesarean section. She refused because she didn't want any scars. By the time she relented, her baby girl survived but her baby boy was a corpse. Was it "her body, her choice?"

What if a woman alleviates morning sickness with Thalidomide, knowing the drug will cause deformities in the baby? Is it "her body, her choice?" Parents must use their bodies to care for their children.

"Your body, your choice" is false and barbaric. It's simply a disgusting excuse to kill your beautiful preborn child, who deserves your love and care. — Buena Hymer, Tiller

"It's a creek? I thought it was a ditch!" ... "It already runs underground through culverts after it goes past my place anyway." ... This won't stop people from using our creeks as dumping grounds." ... Right folks, that's the problem.

"I can't do what I want with my property and that is frustrating and not fair!" Hmm ... I don't have a flippant reply to folks about having some of their land uses curtailed — and mine, too. What's there to say?

Friends and neighbors, we've raised our daughter (and now our grandson!) along the urban creeks and streams in this valley right along with you. And like you, we've seen shopping carts, beheaded deer carcasses, culverts, trash, dark plumes and sheds about to slide in.

But along Crooked Creek, right at our home, and other hidden places amidst the developments, we have also seen deer, raccoons, muskrat, herons, ducks, finches, hummingbirds and mint for our mojitos. Someday, we hope to see our grandkids safely playing with yours in our creeks again.

The riparian ordinance is not perfect. But the pendulum has to swing the other way, and it's our turn to step up to the plate. — Robert and Simone Coffan, Medford