Sheen says he took steroids during 'Major League'

Sheen says he took steroids during 'Major League'

NEW YORK — Turns out Wild Thing's fastball had a little extra juice.

Actor Charlie Sheen tells Sports Illustrated in its latest issue that he took steroids "for like six or eight weeks" while filming the 1989 movie "Major League." He adds that the performance-enhancing drugs helped his fastball go from 79 mph to 85 mph.

Sheen played fireballing relief pitcher Ricky "Wild Thing" Vaughn, whose wayward pitches were often "jussst a bit outside," as Bob Uecker's character, radio broadcaster Harry Doyle, sarcastically announced during the hit comedy.

Sheen, who has made recent headlines for erratic behavior and his firing from the show "Two and a Half Men," says it was the only time he took steroids and they made him a bit more irritable than normal.

AP: Woodson interviewing with Detroit Pistons again

DETROIT — Former Atlanta Hawks coach Mike Woodson will interview for the Detroit Pistons' job for a second time.

A person with knowledge of the situation, speaking on condition of anonymity because the team isn't commenting on the coaching search, says Woodson is set to interview again. Detroit fired coach John Kuester on June 5.

Woodson was an assistant for Larry Brown when the Pistons won the 2004 NBA title — on a staff that also included Kuester.

Boston Celtics assistant Lawrence Frank, Milwaukee Bucks assistant Kelvin Sampson, Minnesota Timberwolves assistant Bill Laimbeer and Orlando Magic assistant Patrick Ewing are other possible coaching candidates.

Kariya retires after concussion-filled career

WINNIPEG, Manitoba — Paul Kariya announced his retirement after 15 seasons in the NHL on Wednesday after being unable to return from post-concussion symptoms that forced him to miss all of last season.

The former star left wing finished his long NHL stint with the St. Louis Blues. Kariya had missed six games in December and January of the 2009-10 season because of a concussion and announced last August that he would sit out the entire 2010-11 season after being examined by concussion specialist Dr. Mark Lovell.

The 36-year-old Kariya scored 402 goals and helped set up 587 others with Anaheim, Colorado, Nashville and St. Louis. He was also a two-time Lady Byng Trophy winner.

Kariya has a long history of concussion troubles, including one that forced him to miss the 1998 Winter Olympics and much of the 1997-98 season following a cross-check to the jaw by Chicago's Gary Suter.

Compiled from wire reports