SHADY COVE — On the outside, the eucalyptus home with cream trim looks pretty much like any other going up on White Oak Way. Beneath the exterior siding and shingles, however, there is a world of difference.

SHADY COVE — On the outside, the eucalyptus home with cream trim looks pretty much like any other going up on White Oak Way. Beneath the exterior siding and shingles, however, there is a world of difference.

The Earth Advantage Platinum house, produced by the Homebuilders Association of Jackson County, has subtle bells and whistles that will add electricity to the grid and money to its future occupants' pocket. The construction project manager was Gary Whittle.

The 2,300-square-foot community sustainability project combines advanced building concepts with Energy Star appliances.

"This is the way houses should be built in the future," said Buzz Thielemann of RHT Energy Solutions. "When we had a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to do this, we wanted to do it right. Our slogan has been 'what's the secret behind the walls.' "

For example, air conditioning and heating ducts are routed away from the usual attic and crawl spaces where 25 to 30 percent of the energy is wasted.

A Showcase Home ribbon-cutting is set for 11 a.m. Friday, launching 10 days of public tours designed to stimulate energy-efficient thinking.

"We wanted the home construction to be something attainable for anyone," said marketing project manager Angalee O'Connor. "It's not a mansion — something most people couldn't finance. It looks like every other house in the subdivision. It's not until people look at the pictures on the wall describing how it's built that they realize how special it is."

Another aim is to influence the way future construction is done by teaching builders and educating homeowners.

"The apprentices learned advance framing, about air-to-air heat exchangers, LED lighting and photovoltaic panels," Thielemann said.

By using new-generation insulation, garage doors and recyclable carpets, builders can create a truly green house.

In the months leading up to completion, Upper Rogue residents have been schooled on renewable energy, tax credits, weatherization, Energy Trust of Oregon operations and incentives during classes at a nearby motel.

"Power bills will be nullified for the next 15 years because of the solar system and participation in Pacific Power's feed in tariff program," Thielemann said. "They are paying 11 cents for a kilowatt hour and receiving 42 cents for the electricity they send to the grid over a 15-year period. They will get a credit on their power bill every month and a check from Pacific Power."

The subdivision, a short distance from Upper Rogue Regional County Park, is one of the few hooked up to a municipal water source in town.

"That's a critical element for the home because of the stability of wells in Shady Cove," O'Connor said. "It was one less hurdle for us to overcome.

Once the tours are over, the house on a third of an acre will be available. It has yet to be priced, O'Connor said, "but it will be in the low $300,000s."

Thielemann said the hope is that the City Council will promote high-efficiency construction by reducing systems development charges on such projects.

Reach reporter Greg Stiles at 541-776-4463 or email business@mailtribune.com.