LAS VEGAS — Floyd Mayweather Jr. was acquitted Wednesday of misdemeanor harassment charges alleging he threatened the lives of two homeowner association security guards in an argument about parking tickets outside the boxer's Las Vegas home.

LAS VEGAS — Floyd Mayweather Jr. was acquitted Wednesday of misdemeanor harassment charges alleging he threatened the lives of two homeowner association security guards in an argument about parking tickets outside the boxer's Las Vegas home.

The 34-year-old prizefighter didn't testify during the Las Vegas Justice Court trial. His attorney called the encounter between Mayweather and the guards a "trivial matter," and said the case hinged on the boxer's celebrity.

Las Vegas Justice of the Peace Diana Sullivan said she wasn't convinced that the guards feared any threat would be carried out. Even the guards testified under questioning by Wright they would have preferred not to take the case to trial.

The not guilty finding was a victory for the undefeated prizefighter, whose legal problems have mounted in the past year. The most serious charges — stemming from a domestic dispute with his ex-girlfriend and two of their children in October 2010 — could put him in prison for 34 years if he's convicted.

The case heard Wednesday was over an Oct. 4, 2010 encounter between Mayweather and two security guards at the Southern Highlands community where he lives in a 12,000-square-foot, $9.5 million home.

Parking for Mayweather's 29 cars has been a frequent source of friction in the gated and patrolled community is about 10 miles south of the Las Vegas Strip.

Mayweather found tickets on his cars, berated the guards for touching the vehicles, removed a ticket from one vehicle and stuck it on the windshield of their security patrol vehicle, the guards, 23-year-old Miguel Burgos and 24-year-old Aaron Ryan, told police.

Burgos said Mayweather told them, "my homies have guns, if you want me to call them they'd come over here and take care of you."