MISSISSAUGA, Ontario — Russian teen Elizaveta Tuktamisheva became Skate Canada's youngest women's winner in 30 years on Saturday, and Patrick Chan began the defense of his world championship with a come-from-behind win in the men's event.

MISSISSAUGA, Ontario — Russian teen Elizaveta Tuktamisheva became Skate Canada's youngest women's winner in 30 years on Saturday, and Patrick Chan began the defense of his world championship with a come-from-behind win in the men's event.

The 14-year-old Tuktamisheva won the short program Friday and finished with 177.38 points after placing second to Japan's Akiko Suzuki in Saturday's free skate. The Russian is the youngest gold medalist since Canada's Tracey Wainman won at age 13 in 1981.

The 26-year-old Suzuki was fourth in the short program and scored 172.26 points overall to earn silver. American Ashley Wagner won bronze with 165.48 points.

"I was so happy with what I put out," Wagner said. "I was very satisfied, with the exception my Lutz."

Chan was third after the men's short program Friday, but his free skate program was good enough, even with a fall and a stumble, to take gold with 253.74 points.

Javier Fernandez of Spain, the leader after the short program, took silver (250.33) and Japan's Daisuke Takahashi won bronze (237.87).

It was Tuktamisheva's first senior Grand Prix appearance.

"I didn't feel a big difference," she said through an interpreter when asked about stepping up from the junior ranks. "I try not to think of the importance of the competition."

Chan fell on his first jump, a quadruple toe loop, but just attempting it was worth a pile of points. He followed with another quad toe and nailed it. He tacked on a triple toe to make it a combo and show why he's the world champion.

The 20-year-old Canadian stumbled on a footwork sequence, too, but his overall skills were better than those of his competitors.

"I made an extra effort to stay relaxed today and it felt good," Chan said. "My (free-skating) program is so brand new that my breathing pattern is not there yet."