Hip-hop artist Tech N9ne plans to unleash Armageddon during his coast-to-coast Hostile Takeover 2012 Tour. The Kansas City, Mo., rapper and Strange Music co-founder tours on the heels of his recent six-song EP, "Klusterf**." In a mere four days, Tech N9ne, together with Miami-based hip-hop group Mayday, wrote, recorded and digitally released the abridged album, which debuted at No. 1 on Billboard's indie charts.

Hip-hop artist Tech N9ne plans to unleash Armageddon during his coast-to-coast Hostile Takeover 2012 Tour.

The Kansas City, Mo., rapper and Strange Music co-founder tours on the heels of his recent six-song EP, "Klusterf**."

In a mere four days, Tech N9ne, together with Miami-based hip-hop group Mayday, wrote, recorded and digitally released the abridged album, which debuted at No. 1 on Billboard's indie charts.

"It's just me going on impulse," says Tech N9ne during a telephone interview. "I was expecting my fans to shun it because it's not bass-driven like the rest of my music. It's live instrumentation."

Tech N9ne, along with Strange Music artists Machine Gun Kelly, Krizz Kaliko, Mayday, Prozak and Stevie Stone, will perform at 8 p.m. Monday, April 30, at the Historic Ashland Armory, 208 Oak St.

Off stage, Tech N9ne is Aaron Yates. He adopted his semi-automatic alias in 1988, at the suggestion of veteran rapper Black Walt.

" 'Tech' is short for technique, nine is the number of completion. The complete technique of rhyme, Tech N9ne, that's me," he says.

As a youth, Tech N9ne admits he was afraid of crowds, performers with their "painted-on smiles" and the mythical Kansas City killer clown. Like Batman, he embraced what he feared and began wearing tribal war paint during concerts.

"When I get that mask on me, it's like something comes out of me that wouldn't really come out of me, that wouldn't come out of everyday, humble Tech N9ne," he says.

Behind his ferocious mask and alter ego, he delivers his obscene, profane and sometimes violent raps unabashed.

Until recent years, Tech N9ne's rhymes were deemed too gangster for TV or radio.

"I've always had roadblocks, but ... real music always shines," he says. "I had no doubt in my mind that the mainstream would go tech one day.

"As Quincy Jones said, 'Rap what you know, and people will forever feel you.'... He made me a vampire. I've seen rappers rise and fall, and I'm still on the incline."

In 2011, Tech N9ne released "All 6's and 7's," featuring guest artists B.o.B, Snoop Dogg, Lil Wayne, T-Pain and others. The album debuted at No. 4 on Billboard 200 after nearly 56,000 copies were sold the first week. Later in the year, he appeared on Lil Wayne's chart-topping album, "Tha Carter IV."

His second 2011 album, "Welcome to Strangeland," featuring a Strange Music lineup of guest artists, debuted at No. 21 on Billboard 200.

Copies of "Klusteroff," as Tech N9ne politely called the album during the interview, are available on iTunes and www.therealtechn9ne.com. All six songs also were included on Mayday's debut, "Take Me to Your Leader," which hit stores March 26.

Tickets cost $27 or $30 at the door (plus fees). Advance tickets are available at www.ticketweb.com or www.ticketswest.com, Music Coop in Ashland, Bad Ass Coffee and 619 Clothing in Medford and Listen Here in Grants Pass.

"I'm 40 years old, but sometimes I feel like I'm 19 up there," he says. "My fans keep me motivated to keep going because they keep coming. ... The older I get, the younger they get."