While listening to Ann Romney's interview a few days ago, I was struck when she revealed her darkest hour, the personal diagnosis of MS. My heart went out to her and I was pleased to learn that dressage, the "ballet" of horse training, brought her some physical and mental relief.

While listening to Ann Romney's interview a few days ago, I was struck when she revealed her darkest hour, the personal diagnosis of MS. My heart went out to her and I was pleased to learn that dressage, the "ballet" of horse training, brought her some physical and mental relief.

Thinking about her situation, I was brought back to the reality of many hard-working, tax-paying citizens who are struck with a similar or worse diagnosis. Without the Romneys' tremendous wealth, they risk the loss of their homes, jobs and sometimes everything. An expensive therapy of any sort, aside from dressage, is unthinkable while they struggle to survive or die in the best way possible.

Our country's present health care system borders on being criminal, but it is considered wonderful and the best in the world for those who can afford it, like our congressmen. I pray for a healthier tomorrow for everyone. — Penny Keenan, Medford

Reading the letter by Chris Olufsen, my heart goes out to him. No one should have their service ignored, but in all honesty, all he had to take was his birth certificate and his DD214. The paperwork to take to the DMV is clear — it must be your DD214, not your discharge papers. The government does not recognize anything other than the DD214 since it is the "official" document of your discharge.

I know this since my son just went and renewed his license and those are the two documents he took and was not given a hard time. He now has his license with the word "Veteran" added.

It only takes a few minutes and you'll get a lot less grief if you take the correct paperwork with you, so please, don't blame them for your mistake. — Wendy Grammatica, Central Point

In his review of the movie "For Greater Glory," Roger Ebert stated that the movie regarding religious freedom applied to Catholics only. This statement upset me and made me sad because, yes, in that period in Mexico from 1926-1929 it was true, but what he failed to understand is that this movie is very applicable to today's world. Catholics are Christians and as we know our Christian religious freedoms are slowly being taken away, squashed and, by this happening insidiously we will wake up one day like the Mexicans in 1926, fighting as they did to keep our religious freedom.

It is a great movie about individuals, the Cristeros, who fought to keep their religious freedom and the blood bath that followed because the peaceful means did not accomplish anything. Most of the people portrayed in the movie were real people, some of whom were canonized, made saints, by Pope John Paul II.

See the bravery and dedication these people exhibited, and see how it left the audience inspired and exhausted. This movie is for all Christians. Wake up and realize this could be us in 2012 to 2014, or farther in the future. It will inspire you! — Adele McVeigh, Phoenix

I'm a recent addition to the area, having moved from Klamath Falls in October. The mortgage mess here is almost as bad as in Klamath Falls, but a possible solution lies in eminent domain and the restructuring of those (foreclosed) mortgages that would be more in line with the actual value of those properties. All that needs to be done is to find local banks and/or credit unions to go along with the plan. — William Mac Bean, White City