Recording CDs quickly and efficiently is something The Avett Brothers know how to do. "We've done them in two weeks," says Scott Avett during a telephone interview. "Surely, 'Emotionalism' was done in 11 days. I mean, we are quite aware of our ability to do that."

Recording CDs quickly and efficiently is something The Avett Brothers know how to do. "We've done them in two weeks," says Scott Avett during a telephone interview. "Surely, 'Emotionalism' was done in 11 days. I mean, we are quite aware of our ability to do that."

The Avett Brothers recently learned the value of taking their time to finish a recording with their new "The Carpenter," set for a Sept. 11 release.

"I could compare it to when I was in one of my painting classes," Avett says. "Things always comes back to me when I'm working on paintings, and I guess it's also true of recordings."

Musicians need to step back and see the whole picture just as painters need to step back and see the whole canvas, he says. When you think about the time it takes to record and the time spent listening and contemplating the music, you realize it's as important to spend equal time playing and listening.

The Avett Brothers will perform at 8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 24, at the Britt Pavilion, 350 First St., Jacksonville.

For the most part, bands such as The Avett Brothers don't have the time to invest in such long recording endeavors. There are demands to produce CDs quickly and get back on tour.

The North Carolina band worked with producer Rick Rubin for "The Carpenter." Rubin has a reputation for serving artists before the bottom line and not letting albums be released before everything is as it should be.

Avett credits Rubin with fostering an environment where creativity could thrive without any outside pressure from the music industry.

"Something we're very thankful of is no deadlines and no budgets," Avett says. "There's a bubble, and within it is the artistic process. Outside of the bubble is entrepreneurship and marketing, and that never needs to make it inside the bubble. It doesn't belong there."

Shutting out outside distractions and pressures had become important for The Avett Brothers. The group, featuring brothers Scott and Seth Avett on banjo and guitar, respectively, Bob Crawford on stand-up bass and cellist Joe Kwon, was coming off the ride of its 2009 album, "I and Love and You," that peaked at No. 16 on Billboard's album charts.

"I and Love and You" retained the Avetts' acoustic foundation with such tunes as "January Wedding" and "Ten Thousand Voices," and also broadened the boys' stylistic reach to a point where the group couldn't be pegged in any specific musical category.

"The Carpenter," Scott Avett says, will build on the stylistic growth that the group attained on "I and Love and You."

"I think it's going in the same direction," Avett says. "I think there's no possible way this album can be considered a bluegrass album, not that any of our albums could have."

Lawn seating for The Avett Brothers' show at the Britt Pavilion is available for $38, $28 for ages 12 and younger. Portland-based alternative-rock band City Squirrel will perform from 6 to 7 p.m. on the Table Rock City Stage. For tickets, see www.brittfest.org or call 541-773-6077.