EAGLE POINT — For the better part of his first season at the helm of Eagle Point's football team, Seth Womack has held the belief that Eagles history is, well, just that ... it's history.

EAGLE POINT — For the better part of his first season at the helm of Eagle Point's football team, Seth Womack has held the belief that Eagles history is, well, just that ... it's history.

Ask him about the fact that the football program hasn't advanced to the state playoffs since 1997, it's a moot point.

Ask him about anything other than this team, this season and this opportunity coming Friday and you're barking up the wrong tree.

"For us we just look at it one game at a time," said the 34-year-old Womack. "We just want to go out and get that sixth one."

That "sixth one" Womack is speaking of is a sixth victory for the Eagles (5-4). It not only would erase the school's playoff drought, a victory would add to an already strong season that saw Eagle Point tie with two others for third place in the Midwestern League.

"For us we look at this as a playoff game and not a play-in game because it's win or go home either way you look at it," said Womack. "If we don't win we're done, we know that."

Whatever the payoff, Womack knows it won't come easy on Friday when his Eagles travel to face Wilsonville at 7 p.m. The Wildcats (5-4) finished in a four-way tie for second in the Northwest Oregon Conference — behind top-ranked Sherwood — and would've had the No. 2 spot to themselves had they not been forced to forfeit a win over Milwaukie due to an ineligible player.

"They're a physical team and they do a lot of things right," said Womack. "They don't get too flashy on offense, it's just old-school football that has been proven to work. We haven't really faced anybody like them in the style of running attack they have."

Womack said Wilsonville provided a look similar to a blend of Marist and Mazama — if he had to choose between teams EP has played — and the Eagles fared well against each earlier this season. The Vikings squeaked out a 38-35 win in the season opener in Klamath Falls, while Eagle Point upset Marist, 14-13, in Eugene on Oct. 4

"I really believe that we can play with anybody in the state," added Womack.

Senior quarterback Jorge Quintero has been the divining rod leading the Eagles to success thus far, completing 125 of 213 passes for 1,917 yards with 23 touchdowns and 12 interceptions. The 5-foot-9, 160-pound Quintero has the capacity to leave the pocket and make plays happen with his legs but has worked especially hard this year to hone his passing skills.

"The kid's a competitor," said Womack. "When I talked to him during my interview out here, I asked him where he saw himself playing and he just said, 'I want to win. I don't care, you can put me wherever.' And that's the truth. With Jorge we could line him up at wide receiver if someone was better at quarterback than him and he'd be completely fine with that and get the job done there, too."

"He just wants to win and help his team," added the coach. "Each week he keeps getting better and better at quarterback. I think his numbers statistically might be better than just about anyone in our league and it's not because he's the biggest or fastest or strongest, it's because he's just going to find a way."

When Quintero does find a way, he has a bevy of options either in the backfield or on the perimeter.

Wide receiver Carlos Flores (6-1, 215) has pulled in 36 passes for 725 yards and eight touchdowns, while fellow senior Peyton Dole (6-4, 225) has 34 catches for 601 yards and 13 TDs and senior Lucas Morris (6-1, 185) has 40 receptions for 483 yards and five TDs.

In and out of the backfield, Seth Arena has provided a valuable dual threat with 1,002 yards rushing and eight TDs on 116 carries while averaging about 9 yards per catch.

"They're a very high pressure defense and bring a ton of people," Womack said of Wilsonville's defensive game plan. "If we can protect well enough and make some holes up front we'll be OK but, of course, that's easy to say."

"I think it's going to be a fun game in that area," he added. "I think offensively we're big enough and fast enough at the skill positions that we hopefully will be able to get around to open spaces and try to neutralize the blitz. At least that's the plan."

Wilsonville head coach Adam Guenther has said his team's defense has been one of its strengths all year because of the Wildcats' swarming, bend-but-don't-break nature. The offense, however, has been as good as any defense due to a determined effort to run the ball and chew up yardage and time of possession.

At the lead for Wilsonville is senior halfback Derek Sunkle (6-2, 185), who ran for 215 yards and three touchdowns in a rout of Liberty and was a driving force to put his team in position for a game-winning field goal with nine seconds to play against Sandy.

Sunkle had season highs in carries (37) and rushing yards (266) and went over 1,500 yards rushing for the season in the comeback win over Sandy.

"He's a good runner," said Womack. "He's patient and is a hard runner and what you want in a running back, that's for sure. He waits for his blockers to set up the blocks and when they do, he hits the hole and he's good at it."

Sophomore quarterback Elijah Benedick (6-1, 175) has added another element to the offense with his passing ability, with Brandon Chao serving as Benedick's favorite target in recent weeks. Junior running back Garrett Chenoweth provides depth in the backfield.

"They like to get the ball outside to the perimeter and then change it up and come inside, too, so you can't overload one or the other because they're capable of doing both," said Womack. "It's going to come down to us executing and doing our jobs and being in the right spots and not overpursuing and playing fundamental football."

Reach reporter Kris Henry at 541-776-4488, khenry@mailtribune.com, www.facebook.com/krishenryMT or www.twitter.com/Kris_Henry