Unscrupulous methods of contractors, disgruntled because of a failure to dictate policies to the state highway commission and county court in the matter of contracts for the Jackson County highway construction, are coming to light. Unsuccessful bidders raised a howl here when the contract for grading was let to the lowest bidder, a Tacoma firm, instead of an Oregon bidder and represented to Portland papers that widespread indignation existed in Jackson County on account of the award — all of which is fabrication. It is reported that letters attacking State Highway Engineer Bolby have been sent to county courts to prejudice them against Major Bowlby.

Unscrupulous methods of contractors, disgruntled because of a failure to dictate policies to the state highway commission and county court in the matter of contracts for the Jackson County highway construction, are coming to light. Unsuccessful bidders raised a howl here when the contract for grading was let to the lowest bidder, a Tacoma firm, instead of an Oregon bidder and represented to Portland papers that widespread indignation existed in Jackson County on account of the award — all of which is fabrication. It is reported that letters attacking State Highway Engineer Bolby have been sent to county courts to prejudice them against Major Bowlby.

Among these contractors are Beall & Company, which in addition to selling road machinery, specializes in corrugated steel culverts. Because Major Bowlby did not specify corrugated steel culverts, but left the field open for reinforced concrete culverts, Beall sent him word, according to Bolby, that they intended to "get the goat." He sent back word for them to get it.

When the contracts were awarded, T.J. Patterson, traveling representative of Beall & Co., who was present, exclaimed vigorously against the contract going outside of Oregon, and demanded a list from the county clerk of engineering expenses incurred on the Siskiyou Road — evidently part of the program to "get Bowlby's goat."

Last spring the county court purchased a car of corrugated steel culverts from Beall & Co. through Patterson. County Judge Tou Velle gave Patterson a ride to the Medford Hotel. When Patterson got out, he told Tou Velle that if he desired any auto tires, Beall & Co. would be pleased to send him a set at cost — explaining that they were in a position to secure them at a very low price and would be pleased to send a set. Judge Tou Velle thanked him, and said he needed no tires and when he did, preferred to buy them himself.