Five cars of Rogue River valley potatoes were shipped Friday to the United States Army on the Mexico-Texas border. The price received was 75 cents a sack. The shipment was made by the C.S. Lebo company. It is reported that there is a shortage of spuds in Texas and a steady demand for Oregon products.

Five cars of Rogue River valley potatoes were shipped Friday to the United States Army on the Mexico-Texas border. The price received was 75 cents a sack. The shipment was made by the C.S. Lebo company. It is reported that there is a shortage of spuds in Texas and a steady demand for Oregon products.

Fifteen cars of potatoes have been shipped from valley points, and while there are several more carloads that could be shipped, most are being held for late spring markets.

Five cars of onions have been shipped and probably 300,000 pounds of beans. While these figures ought to be ten-fold as great, they show the balance of trade is turning in the valley's favor, for three years ago just as many cars of these products were being imported.

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MILWAUKEE, Wis., Jan. 24 — Displaying the same form that made him lighweight champion of the world, Ad Wolgast of Cadillac, Mich., today holds a clear-cut decision over Joe Rivers of Los Angeles as a result of their ten-round bout here last night. Wolgast's punches never carried more punishing power than they did last night, and his eye never was more accurate.

Rivers bled profusely from the mouth and nose throughout the ten rounds. The former champion started the claret flowing from Joe's mouth and nose in the second round and throughout the remaining sessions kept peppering away at the tender spots.

Wolgast was entitled to the decision by his superior infighting. At times he fought the Mexican all over the ring, but Rivers always came back for more. Twice the former champion fell to the floor from the force of missed swings and each time Joe fell on top of him.

Rivers kept playing for Ad's jaw, but only twice during the ten rounds did he come near finding his mark. Once in the third and again in the tenth he came within a hair's breadth of reaching Wolgast's jaw, and the former champion was shaken up good each time.

The Milwaukee press, as well as the fans who saw the bout, were convinced that Wolgast could defeat Ritchie. A week's training, the fight critics said, would put him back into the best condition of his career.

Rivers was not disgraced by his showing last night. He fought like a tiger. At the close of the tenth round he seemed as fresh as at the start. But so did Wolgast.