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MailTribune.com
  • Mail Tribune 100

    The following news items were drawn from the archives of the Mail Tribune 100 years ago.
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  • Aug. 7, 1914
    George H. Daggett of the Groveland orchards yesterday shipped the first car of Bartlett pears of the season to eastern markets. The consignment consisted of 523 boxes to New York, and was shipped through Guy W. Connor of Gobel & Day.
    Arrangements have been made by Mr. Conner to take care of small shippers through the Medford Warehouse company's warehouse on South Front Street.
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    Three carloads of Bartletts were sold this afternoon to Philadelphia, New York and Boston markets at $1.50, $1.65 and $1.75, good opening of the season prices. This, with the George H. Daggett car, makes four cars of Rogue River fruit sold in the east today. Fruit growers are hopeful with the opening prices and the California crop of pears short and all shipped and packed. The picking and packing of fruit is in full swing.
    Summary of Day's War News
    Winston Spencer Churchill, first lord of the British admiralty declared in the House of Commons that there had not been any fighting or losses other than had been announced officially. This statement ensued on reports of a naval battle between German and British ships received from several sources, but the British admiralty refused information. It was regarded as significant that the fishing fleets on the east coast of England were given permission to go out and fish.
    Complete silence reigns as to military movements in both Germany and France, and it is assumed both armies are concentrating for decisive battles. No hint as to where they will come into contact has been given.
    Liege, Belgium, was again attacked by German troops last night, but was still holding out. The report of a German reverse there was denied in a dispatch from Berlin.
    The German cruisers Goeben and Breslau have gone out to meet the British fleet. The commanders are said to have handed their wills to the German consul before departure.
    A London newspaper says the German crown prince has been seriously injured by an unidentified assailant. A Finnish sea captain reported the Russian navy bottled up at Helsingsfors and the Russian port of Nelva to be burning after an attack by German vessels. No confirmation.
    Many German merchant vessels were brought into English ports today by British cruisers. The Holland Lloyd steamer Tubantia, with $2,500,000 from South America for the Deutsche bank in London, was also brought in.
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