April 21, 1917

SHORTAGE OF EGGS KEEPS PRICES UP THROUGH VALLEY

The high prices of eggs in Medford for this time of year is mainly due to shortage of production, it is said, caused by the high prices of grain. Many persons have killed off some of their hens rather than support them with the high-prices grain.

Then, too, most of the eggs coming in are purchased for packing, and to supply the Puget Sound and Alaska trade. There is big demand for eggs from these sections. In the past five weeks it is estimated that at least two carloads of eggs have been shipped out from Medford.

Eggs are now selling at retail for 30 cents a dozen, or two dozen for 55 cents. The prices paid by Medford grocers and other buyers to producers varies, but averages about 30 cents a dozen in trade to 26 to 27 cents a dozen cash payment.

BOOTLEGGING TRIAL IS HELD

A large crowd of interested spectators was in attendance in Judge Taylor's court Saturday afternoon to witness the jury trial of Little Joe Wilson and C. V. Beeler of Ashland on a bootlegging charge. County Prosecutor Roberts prosecuted the case and E. E. Kelly represented the two defendants. The trial was not completed at the hour of going to press.

COUNTY AGENT TO ACT AS BUREAU FOR EMPLOYMENT

County Agent C. C. Cate, whose office is in the Garnett-Corey building, has received the following from Paul V. Maris, county agent in the co-operative agricultural work carried on by the United States and Agricultural college:

"The reports which you have submitted on the labor situation in your respective counties indicate that in practically half of the counties there will be an inadequate supply of labor to plant the normal acreage of crops. It is agreed by all that the situation will become more acute as harvest time comes on, especially if army enlistment is to continue between now and then, as it is altogether probable."