July 2, 1917

KLAMATH INDIANS SEEK TO BECOME CITIZENS OF U. S.

Dissatisfied with prevailing conditions on the Klamath Indian reservation, and desiring to become citizens of the United States, a general meeting of all Indians has been called for July 5th at the old celebration grounds, near Fort Klamath, to consider plans for bringing this matter about.

Clayton Kirk, WIlliam Crawford, Abraham Charley and Garfield Jack are among the leaders of the movement, and are among the influential men of the tribe.

The Indians feel that they are now capable of undertaking the responsibilities of citizenship, and can look after their own interests better than they are now taken care of by the Indian department.

Clayton Kirk has recently returned from a trip to Washington, D. C., where he went as a delegate in tribal interests. He is not satisfied with the way the Indian problems are handled in the department, and dsieres the Klamaths to take steps to prove their ability to handle their own affairs. The committee also desires the reservation lands to be thrown open.

ASHLAND'S BIG CELEBRATION OPENS TUESDAY MORNING

Tomorrow ushers in the Rogue River Roundup and general celebration here for three days, July 3, 4 and 5. Amidst the merriment the patriotic spirit will not be overlooked, for on Wednesday morning, July 4, there will be a distinctive program which will appeal particularly to an uncompromising loyal sentiment. The order of the exercises will be outlined on the morrow.

DRIEST JUNE IN 16 YEARS SHOWS ON GRAIN CROPS

June was a bright, sunny month, with but .06 inches of rainfall, which fell on the 9th. There were 22 clear days, 6 partly clear and two cloudy. The hottest day was the 15th, with 96 maximum, and the coldest night of the 3rd, with 35. The average temperature was normal but the rainfall was the lowest for the month since 1901, the average being 1.05 inches.