Sept. 14, 1917

INCREASE IN PAY DENIED FIREMEN BY CITY COUNCIL

The city firemen will not receive the raise in pay asked for. This decision was reached by a conference held by the city council last night. The matter will be formally disposed of publicly at the regular council meeting next Tuesday night, and unless the council changes its mind on the matter at that time it is probable that at least two of the firemen will resign.

It is said that three of the councilmen are opposed to raising the pay of firemen from $75 to $80, the same as is paid the policemen. Dr. Keene is opposed to the raise on general principles, and the other two councilmen base their opposition on the ground that the state of the city's finances will not stand the raise.

The firemen not only claim that they should be paid as much at least as the policemen, but should be paid more, as they are on duty twenty-four hours a day, and the policemen work in eight-hour shifts. Mayor Gates favors the rise in pay for the firemen.

Several other city employees are also disgruntled over their pay, but see no chance of getting a raise, and, like the firemen, are keeping an eye out for more lucrative positions.

The city council also discussed the proposed shack ordinance which will be introduced for passage next Tuesday evening. This ordinance will provide for the razing of all unsightly shacks and old abandoned structures throughout the city.

LOCAL AND PERSONAL

Workmen are busy at Washington School renovating and repainting the desks in all the rooms, 460 in number. The work will be completed in time for the opening of the schools on October 1. At several of the school buildings workmen are also busy building bins in which coal will be stored. The first of the 150 tons of coal ordered by the school board is expected to arrive in the city.