Nov. 9, 1917

Y.M.C.A. HOME TO THE TROOPS ON FIRING LINE

Homesickness is one of the things that the Y.M.C.A. has to combat among the soldiers. Boys who have never been away from home before, thrown into strange surroundings, their little world turned topsy-turvy, find themselves lonesome and heartsick. They turn to the Y.M.C.A. for friendship and they find it. It is the nearest thing to home that they come into contact with. If this help was the only thing that the Y.M.C.A. accomplished it would be worth the price that is costs, but the Y.M.C.A. is one of the strongest factors making for a better morale in the army.

To continue this work and to extend it among the armies of Russia, France and Italy, and serve the American troops at home and abroad, the national war council of the Y.M.C.A. is raising the sum of $35,000,000. The drive will be conducted from November 11 to 19. Every one is asked to contribute. The money is used to make the soldier boy happier and more contented in his army life. It is all for him. Every cent is used for his welfare.

In is no time to be squeamish — the people of Jackson county must know the facts. The Y.M.C.A. officials have been advised that the Association is so sorely needed by our allies, because in the armies of them there are more men in the hospitals and detention camps suffering from venereal diseases than from wounds and all other diseases combined. It has been found that the administrations of the Association result in a marked decrease of these diseases.

Within a few months, perhaps weeks, at least four hundred men from Jackson county will be in France — some of them are there now. It is up to those who stay at home to provide intellectual and physical relaxation for those who offer their lives by going abroad. The man who is so situated that he can't go has just as much of a duty to perform as the man who can go. We are all soldiers, only some of us fight with weapons that make no noise.