Mackenzie Long

June 1, 2000 - April 4, 2018

Mackenzie, or Kenzie, as she preferred, is survived by her parents, Andrea and Ryan; and her sisters, Madison and Ronni. Mackenzie was born in the Rogue Valley and was finishing her senior year at the Crater Academy for Health and Public Service. Her death was due to complications from a blood clot in her lung.

Kenzie loved all things Disney, which created a passion for digital art and animation that she intended to follow in the fall by attending Western Oregon University. Her passions were for art, make-up, friends, and family. A private celebration of Mackenzie’s life was held on Saturday, April 14.

Friends and loved ones of Kenzie have come forward and asked to assist in completing her senior “Be the Change” project at the local elementary school she had attended (CPE). She had planned improvements to the playground area. Initial support has been so generous that we have decided to accept donations in her honor and will create a meaningful tribute to Mackenzie at CPE, so that her                legacy of caring and kindness will live on. If you have a heart to donate to Mackenzie’s project, you may do so by going in to any Rogue Credit Union branch where they are accepting Mackenzie Long Donations. You may also go to https://mealtrain.com/glqqwl and make a donation online.

Mackenzie was one of the most beautiful souls you could ever hope to encounter. She had this amazing gift for being in the room and surprising you beyond measure when she would speak. Her humor was dry, but kind. Her thoughts were for your well-being, but insightfully honest. Her actions were pure, yet lined with purpose. She didn’t want to stand out, but always left an impression. She loved caring for people, but was guarded with allowing others in. She had a poet’s way of thinking, an artist’s eye for beauty, and a teacher’s heart for her community. She was the sunshine in our darkest days. She had          raging storms of emotions that drove her, and the raw power to control them. Her capacity for feeling was boundless – when she hurt, the world got dimmer; when she was happy, you almost needed to look away from her radiance. Nothing could ever hope to replace her importance in the lives of those she touched. However – if you were lucky enough to have ever felt that touch – you have the mark of an              angel on your soul. We take comfort and joy in the knowledge that she is ever-present inside us. Living with her memory provides us strength to move beyond our own limits. Knowing she is beautiful and whole and in an infinitely better place gives us peace and tranquility. Reflecting back on memories of Kenzie, one can only conjure intense feelings of joy. Our only sorrow is that we can’t create new ones.