fb pixel

Log In


Reset Password

AP: Latest developments in Election 2016

Here are the latest developments in the U.S. election (all times are PST). This story will be updated throughout the day.

9:50 p.m.Democratic incumbent Ellen Rosenblum has retained her seat as attorney general.  Rosenblum, the first woman to hold the position, defeated Republican Daniel Zene Crowe.___9:20 p.m.A measure that will use state funding to try to boost Oregon's high school graduation rate, which is among the worst in the nation, has passed.Measure 98 calls for the Legislature to budget $800 for every Oregon high school student, or about $150 million each year, for programs that are known to improve graduation rates.The measure won't raise taxes and doesn't have a funding source.Critics worry about paying for the programs if state revenues fail to meet expectations.Measure 94, which would have amended the state constitution to lift a ban on state judges serving beyond age 75, has failed.The measure had no organized opposition.___9 p.m.Oregon voters have rejected a measure that would require corporations with at least $25 million in Oregon sales to pay more in tax to help fund education and other services.Opponents and supporters of Measure 97 battled bitterly during a campaign in which the two sides raised about $25 million.Backers of the measure said big corporations based out of state needed to pay more to help pay for education and other services in Oregon.Opponents said Measure 97 would also hurt Oregon companies and that it would raise costs that would be passed onto consumers__8:45 p.m.Gov. Kate Brown, a Democrat, has beaten her Republican opponent, Bud Pierce.Brown's victory keeps her in the governor's job for another two years. She will be finishing the last two years of the term of Gov. John Kitzhaber, who quit in February 2015 because of an influence-peddling scandal swirling around him and his fiancee, Cylvia Hayes.Brown, the nation's first bisexual governor, took over for Kitzhaber because as secretary of state she was next in line.There will be another gubernatorial election in 2018___8:40 p.m.Voters have approved a measure that would use a slice of Oregon Lottery proceeds to pay for outdoor school programs for children throughout the state.Early voting showed wide support for Measure 99.The measure calls for taking up to $22 million from the state lottery's economic development fund to send 50,000 fifth- or sixth-graders to Outdoor School each year.Many school districts have had to scrap Outdoor School programs because of caps on property taxes and the recent recession.Measure 99 is intended to ensure that Oregon kids don't miss out on an opportunity to learn about plants and animals, soil and water, and other aspects of the natural environment.__8:35 p.m.Voters have approved a measure that amends the state constitution to allow public universities to invest student tuition or state appropriations in the stock market.Early voting shows broad support for Measure 95.Oregon's constitution forbids state agencies, including the state's public universities, from playing the stock market.Supporters of Measure 95 said allowing public universities to invest in equities would give them another tool for generating revenue.The University of Oregon had asked state lawmakers to put Measure 95 on the ballot___8:30 p.m.Voters have approved a measure to dedicate a portion of Oregon Lottery revenue to improve services for the state's military veterans.Early voting showed that Measure 96 was leading by a wide margin.The measure calls for earmarking 1.5 percent of lottery proceeds for veterans' services. That's nearly $19 million every two years.The money would be used to help veterans access state and federal benefits, as well as for employment, education, housing, health care and treatment programs.___8:25 p.m.Democratic U.S. Reps. Peter DeFazio, Suzanne Bonamici and Earl Blumenauer have been re-elected to their seats in Congress.

8:05 p.m.U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden has handily defeated Republican challenger Mark Callahan to retain his seat.The Democratic incumbent had also faced four other candidates from minor parties.

4:20 p.m.

Vast divides of race, gender and education are keeping the presidential race in two tightly fought southern states close shortly after polls close.

In both Virginia and Georgia, about 9 in 10 black voters and two-thirds of Hispanics backed Clinton, while most whites backed Trump.

That's according to exit polls conducted by Edison Research for national media outlets.

In Georgia, large majorities of whites with and without college degrees backed Trump. In Virginia those two groups diverged. Whites without a college degree backed Trump by a large margin, while those with a degree split their votes between the two major-party candidates.

Women in both states were far more likely than men to back Clinton. Majorities of women in both states said Trump's treatment of women bothers them a lot.

___

4:20 p.m.

Republican Donald Trump has won Kentucky and Indiana while Democrat Hillary Clinton has won Vermont.

Trump was awarded Kentucky's eight electoral votes and Indiana's 11. Vermont gives Clinton three. These are the first states to be decided Tuesday in the 2016 general election.

The wins were expected.

Vermont has voted for a Democrat every election since 1988, while Kentucky has gone Republican every cycle since 2000.

Indiana is normally a Republican stronghold but went for President Barack Obama in 2008. The Republicans captured it again in 2012 and Trump's running mate, Mike Pence, is the state's governor.

The winning candidate needs 270 electoral votes.

___

4:20 p.m.

Americans who have voted already in the presidential election appear to be evenly divided on the benefits of international trade.

According to an exit poll conducted by Edison Research for national media outlets, about four out of 10 voters believe trade among nations creates jobs. Another four out of 10 say it takes jobs from Americans.

Republican nominee Donald Trump has railed against decades of U.S. trade policy and has energized working-class voters with his promises to create more jobs at home. Democrat Hillary Clinton has historically supported U.S. trade deals, including as secretary of state.

But she has backed off her support for the Trans-Pacific Partnership. President Barack Obama's trade agreement with Pacific Rim nations is still pending.

3:25 p.m.

Hillary Clinton is thanking members of a Facebook group called "Pantsuit Nation."

In a message Tuesday, Clinton said the group, which was named for her signature apparel, provides a special place for supporters to build a community. She said that "for some of you, it's been difficult to feel like you could wear your support on your sleeve."

Clinton also joked about the group's moniker, saying "have you ever heard a better name?!"

The Democratic presidential nominee said she was hopeful she would win the presidential contest. If she does, she said she wants "to use those pantsuits for the best occasion of all — celebrating."

3:13 p.m.

Guests are beginning to gather at Donald Trump's election night party in midtown Manhattan.

The GOP nominee is holding his event in the grand ballroom of a midtown Hilton hotel, where a stage has been decorated with dozens of American and state flags.

Trump's campaign has also set up museum-style glass displays around the venue holding campaign merchandise, including his iconic "Make America Great Again" hats and pins.

3:13 p.m.

More than half of Americans who went to the polls earlier Tuesday say Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton has the temperament to serve as president. About a third of voters say the same about Republican nominee Donald Trump.

But neither candidate can claim a mandate as the honest candidate according to the preliminary results of exit polling conducted by Edison Research for The Associated Press and television networks.

About six out of 10 voters say they don't view Clinton as honest. About the same proportion say Trump isn't honest. About three out of 10 voters say they believe neither candidate is honest.

As for what percentage of voters think both nominees are honest, that number is in single digits.

3:13 p.m.

The Colorado Secretary of State's voter registration system went down for nearly 30 minutes during midday voting Tuesday.

The failure forced in-person voters to cast provisional ballots, and some county clerks were unable to process mail ballots that needed to have the signature verified.

Tauna Lockhart, spokeswoman for the state information technology office, says the system came back up about 3:20 p.m. She says the incident is under investigation by state officials, but there is no evidence the network was hit by hackers.

She says the IT office has been monitoring its network for activity and said "there were no blips or anything."

2:56 p.m.

Police say they arrested two women after they took off their tops in protest at the Manhattan polling place used by Donald Trump.

The disruption occurred Tuesday morning at a grade school gym about two hours before Trump arrived.

The women began shouting and took off their tops to reveal anti-Trump slogans painted across their bare chests before police escorted then away.

They were released after being given summonses for electioneering, a violation of rules outlawing political activity at polls.

2:55 p.m.

At least 2,000 people are already waiting inside the New York City convention center where Hillary Clinton is scheduled to hold her election night party.

Most people are sitting on the floor in an area the size of an airplane hangar. A handful of women are wearing pantsuits to honor Clinton.

Barnard College senior Madeline Walsh is wearing a black pantsuit. She says the garment means its wearer is more than just a woman.

2:40 p.m.

A spokesman says former President George W. Bush did not vote for Republican Donald Trump or Democrat Hillary Clinton.

Freddy Ford says the most recent Republican president voted "none of the above for president and Republican down-ballot." That means Bush voted for Republicans in congressional and local races.

It's not a complete surprise. The Bush family includes the two most recent Republican presidents but neither endorsed nor campaigned for the billionaire businessman who captured the party's nomination. Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush was a one-time favorite to win the GOP presidential nomination until Trump got into the race and branded him with a name that stuck: "Low energy."

2:40 p.m.

Preliminary presidential exit polls results suggest that a clear majority of Americans going to the polls Tuesday have at least a moderate amount of confidence that votes will be counted accurately.

About half of those polled for The Associated Press and television networks told Edison Research they are very confident in the results. Another third said they are somewhat confident.

Fewer than one out of five say they're not very confident or at all confident in the vote count.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has railed against the electoral system. He's called it rigged and suggested without evidence there is widespread voter fraud that could affect the outcome.

2:40 p.m.

Just more than half of voters going to the polls Tuesday approve of the job President Barack Obama is doing. But a majority is still upset with the way the federal government is working.

That's according to preliminary results of the exit poll conducted for The Associated Press and television networks by Edison Research.

Just under half of those surveyed say they're dissatisfied with the government's performance. About a quarter say they're angry.

About four out of 10 voters said the top quality they're looking for in a candidate is change. That outranks good judgment, the right experience and caring about people like you as the preferred qualities in a president.

2:40 p.m.

Arizona's most populous county may not know its vote totals today, which could leave in doubt the presidential race in the traditionally Republican-voting state.

Maricopa County, which includes Phoenix, expects to have more than 350,000 uncounted early ballots by the time the polls close. Roughly 1.1 million voters in the metropolitan county had returned early votes as of Tuesday, up 140,000 from 2012.

Election workers had counted roughly 800,000, leaving more than 200,000 to count. Roughly 150,000 are expected to have been dropped off at polling sites around the county.

Elizabeth Bartholomew, communication manager for Maricopa County Recorder's office, says, "If there's a large enough gap in votes, you might not be able to call some races."

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton were running neck-and-neck in Arizona, carried by Republicans in all but one election since 1952.

2:40 p.m.

Neither Donald Trump nor Hillary Clinton is able to claim favorable standing with a majority of the U.S. electorate.

Six of 10 voters say they are somewhat bothered or bothered a lot by Clinton's use of a private email server while secretary of state, according to preliminary results from exit polling conducted by Edison Research for The Associated Press and television networks.

More than seven out of 10 presidential voters say they are irked by Trump's treatment of women.

Trump hammered Clinton for how she handled classified information at the State Department. The FBI twice said it had no cause to pursue criminal charges.

Clinton blistered Trump after disclosure of a 2005 video that captured Trump discussing sexually predatory behavior toward women.

2:40 p.m.

Fewer than half of voters who cast presidential ballots say they made their choice out of a strong preference for their candidate.

That's according to preliminary results of the exit poll conducted for The Associated Press and television networks by Edison Research.

The early exit polls found both Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton are viewed unfavorably by a majority of the presidential electorate. A majority of the electorate also distrusts each of them.

A third of voters said they have reservations about the candidate they backed. A quarter of voters say their vote was mostly about opposing another candidate.

In 2012, the presidential electorate was more optimistic about their choices. That year, about two out of three voters said they strongly backed their candidate.

2:13 p.m.

Seven in 10 Americans going to the polls Tuesday say they think immigrants now in the country illegally should be allowed to stay. Just a quarter say they should be deported.

More than half say they oppose building a wall along the Mexican border to stop illegal immigration, according to preliminary results from the exit poll conducted for The Associated Press and television networks by Edison Research.

But immigration isn't necessarily at the top of the minds of most voters. Just 1 in 10 say immigration is the most important issue facing the country.

Republican Donald Trump made cracking down on immigration a top item on his agenda.

2:13 p.m.

Most voters going to the polls Tuesday have a pessimistic view of the U.S. economy.

According to preliminary results of an exit poll conducted by the Associated Press and television networks by Edison Research, about 6 in 10 describe the state of the economy as not so good or poor.

But that economic unhappiness isn't as high as it was in 2012, when three-quarters called the economy not so good or poor.

Among voters today, 3 in 10 say their personal financial situation has gotten better in the last four years, while nearly as many say it's gotten worse.

More than half of voters say the economy is the most important issue facing the country, over terrorism, foreign policy and immigration.

1:59 p.m.

Authorities have beefed up Election Day security for Donald Trump by parking dump trucks filled with sand outside his Trump Tower building on Fifth Avenue.

Police said Tuesday that similar precautionary measures were being taken at other sites around midtown Manhattan where Trump and Hillary Clinton plan to spend election night.

Authorities say the heavy trucks could block an attempted car bombing. They say there are no confirmed terror threats.

The NYPD had previously said it will deploy more than 5,000 police officers to keep order on election night. The deployment also includes police helicopters, mobile radiation detectors and bomb-sniffing dogs.

1:55 p.m.

A state judge in Nevada has denied a request from the Donald Trump campaign to preserve ballots and voting materials related to what the campaign alleges were irregularities during early voting.

Clark County District Court Judge Gloria Sturman said Tuesday that making the names of poll workers part of the court record could expose them to "public attention, ridicule and harassment."

She says the county registrar is already required to keep the records, and the Nevada Secretary of State is responsible for investigating the complaint.

Trump campaign attorney Brian Hardy told the judge he wants to preserve records from the final day of early voting at four locations in the Las Vegas area.

The campaign says allowing people to vote past closing time was illegal, but the county says they were accommodating people already in line.

The Trump campaign lodged a separate complaint with the secretary of state.

1:27 p.m.

A software glitch that indicated scores of voters showing up at the polls had already cast ballots has led to voting delays in one of North Carolina's most heavily Democratic counties.

North Carolina Board of Elections lawyer Josh Lawson says officials in Durham County quickly concluded that there was a problem with their electronic poll books and began relying on paper rolls to confirm voter registrations. Attempts to vote twice are rare.

Lawson says there's no indication "nefarious activity" caused the computer problems. Rather, he said it could have been a failure to clear out caches of votes cast during the primaries.

About two dozen other counties using the same software have not reported problems.

Lawson said those in line when the polls close will still be allowed to vote.

12:45 p.m.

Portland voters who waited until the last day to cast their ballots have been rewarded with an unseasonably warm and sunny day.

Voters have been steadily flowing into Pioneer Courthouse Square to cast their ballots. This being Portland, those interviewed tended to be Democrat and said the presidential race was their main motivation.

Christie Moore got the day off work to cast her ballot for Hillary Clinton, saying she's fearful for the future of the democracy if Donald Trump wins. The 41-year-old lamented that the political parties are so much more polarized than when she was young.

Josh Rushton also voted for Clinton. He expects the Democrat to prevail, but says he's concerned about where supporters of Trump will next channel their anger and frustration. He doubts Clinton will be able to unite the divided nation.

And should Trump win? Rushton said: "At that point, there's nothing to do but have a sense of humor and hope it's an interesting experiment."

Noon

President Barack Obama is hitting the radio airwaves to encourage Americans to go to the polls to vote for Hillary Clinton.

The White House said Obama gave Election Day interviews to six radio stations that target listeners in Orlando, Detroit and Philadelphia. The cities are in states where the race is believed to be close between Clinton and Republican Donald Trump.

Obama told syndicated host Jana Sutter that continuing the work of the past eight years depends on having a "steady, smart, serious" president follow him into office.

He praised Clinton and reiterated his view that Trump is unfit to be president.

11:45 a.m.

Donald Trump is rekindling his unsubstantiated concerns about a rigged election system.

Asked Tuesday afternoon on Fox News if he would accept the election results, Trump continued to demur.

The Republican presidential nominee said: "We're going to see how things play out."

He said. "I want to see everything honest."

Concerns about voter intimidation and fraud led to a flurry of lawsuits in the run-up to Election Day. New voter regulations in more than a dozen states also held the potential to sow confusion at polling places.

But at least in the early going, most of the problems at polling places appeared to be routine — the kinds of snags that come every four years, including long lines, machines not working properly, and issues with ballots or voter rolls.

11:20 a.m.

It could be the first lawsuit of Election Day. Donald Trump's campaign is alleging polling place "anomalies" during early voting in the Las Vegas area last week.

A lawsuit filed Tuesday in Nevada court asks that records from four early voting spots that allegedly stayed open too late last Friday be impounded and preserved.

Long lines kept polls open past the 7 p.m. posted closing time at locations that included a Mexican market and several shopping centers. Officials say at one site, the last voter cast a ballot after 10 p.m.

Criticism is also coming from state Republican Party chief Michael McDonald.

But Democrat Hillary Clinton's campaign is dismissing the Nevada case in a Twitter message, calling it "a frivolous lawsuit."

10:30 a.m.

President Barack Obama says his faith in the American people hasn't wavered.

Asked whether he was feeling nervous about the presidential election outcome, Obama said "I think we'll do a good job" as long as the American people vote.

Lines were long in some areas as voters chose between Democrat Hillary Clinton, Republican Donald Trump and some third-party candidates.

Obama said he hopes everyone has "voted early. If not, get out there."

Obama supports Clinton and voted early last month in his Chicago hometown. He spoke while walking from the White House residence to the Oval Office, following his Election Day tradition of playing basketball with friends.

10:25 a.m.

Eric Trump may have broken New York state law by tweeting a photo of his completed ballot.

The second son of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump tweeted a photo of a ballot with the oval over his father's name filled in on Tuesday.

The tweet said "It is an incredible honor to vote for my father! He will do such a great job for the U.S.A!" It was later deleted from Trump's Twitter account.

An 1890 New York law bans voters from showing marked election ballots to others. A federal judge ruled last week that the law applies to social media posts.

Representatives for Eric Trump and the New York City Board of Elections did not immediately respond to calls seeking comment.

10:20 a.m.

It was a quick trip to the voting booth for Donald Trump's running mate on Tuesday.

Indiana Governor Mike Pence was joined by his wife, Karen, as they voted in Indianapolis. The couple encountered no lines and spent about five minutes filling out their ballots.

Pence told a small crowd afterward that he was grateful for the "support and prayers of people all across the United States" and he pledged a more prosperous America with the Trump-Pence ticket.

Pence and his wife voted in a precinct that has leaned liberal in past elections.

10:15 a.m.

Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg says a victory for Hillary Clinton on Election Day would be "inspirational" to young women. But she joked that this wouldn't lead to a "global girlfriends' network."

At a Berlin press conference with German Chancellor Angela Merkel Tuesday, Solberg said a female U.S. president would show women that politics isn't "something that belongs to men."

Merkel echoed Solberg's comments about creating more of a global balance between men and women in power. She declined to comment on whom she'd like to win the election, pointing out that the "trans-Atlantic partnership is certainly a prerequisite for us, especially cooperation in NATO."

Republican Donald Trump has said that he may revisit the longstanding NATO alliance if elected.

9 a.m.

Billionaire Warren Buffett is devoting part of Election Day to get-out-the-vote efforts — as he helps drive voters to the polls on a trolley he hired.

The longtime Democrat had promised to help boost turnout at a Hillary Clinton rally in Omaha in August. Buffett says some people have it tougher than others — maybe an illness or trouble with their car. He says he wants to do his part so everyone gets a chance to vote.

More than 1,000 people have volunteered to help Buffett drive voters to the polls.

Buffett is a supporter of Clinton's, but on Tuesday he declined to talk about that. Instead, he said he just wanted to encourage everyone to vote regardless of party affiliation.

___

8:40 a.m.

President Barack Obama says on Twitter that "progress is on the ballot" Tuesday.

He's urging his more than 11 million Twitter followers to "go vote." He also says they should make sure that their friends, family and everyone they know votes, too.

Obama has campaigned aggressively to help elect Democrat Hillary Clinton.

He used the "progress is on the ballot" line at many of the get-out-the-vote rallies he headlined for his former secretary of state.

___

8:35 a.m.

Election officials say voting machine problems in southern Utah are forcing poll workers to use paper ballots, potentially affecting tens of thousands of people.

Utah Director of Elections Mark Thomas says a programming problem has affected all voting in Washington County, but so far appears it appears limited to that county.

He says about 52,000 registered voters there have yet to cast their ballots.

Election workers are trying to fix the computer problem and hope they can start using the voting machines later in the day.

Thomas says officials were prepared with backup paper ballots. But he said they will need to print more if the problem persists.

There are about 80,000 total registered voters in Washington County. Some 28,000 have already cast their ballots through early voting.

___

8:25 a.m.

Donald Trump has voted in New York City.

Hundreds of onlookers watched as Trump, his wife Melania, daughter Ivanka, and son-in-law Jared arrived Tuesday morning at their polling place at a public school on Manhattan's East Side.

Trump said: "it's a great honor, a tremendous honor" to be casting his ballot.

He said he's feeling confident about the outcome, citing "tremendous enthusiasm."

As for his longstanding concerns about voter fraud, he says. "We're always concerned about that."

His final message to voters: "Make America great again. That's all it is. That's what it's all about."

___

8:05 a.m.

Hillary Clinton is getting some quirky questions in Election Day radio interviews.

Clinton phoned WKZL in North Carolina and was asked whether she prefers Pepsi or Coke? Coke, said Clinton.

Toilet paper — over the top or under the bottom of the roll? "Usually over, but I can live with under," quipped Clinton.

And, sleeping arrangements. Clinton told WXKS in Boston that she won't switch which side of the bed she sleeps on if elected president. The White House will have to put the storied presidential phone on her side, not on the side that her former president husband sleeps on.

She said: "I have my side, and it works very well for us." As for Bill, she said, "I think he'll be happy to let me answer it."

___

7:55 a.m.

WikiLeaks chief Julian Assange says he wasn't trying to influence the U.S. presidential election when his organization published hacked emails from Hillary Clinton's campaign.

In a statement Tuesday, Assange denied he was trying to support Green Party candidate Jill Stein or take revenge for the jailing of former U.S. intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning.

Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison for leaking secret U.S. government documents to WikiLeaks.

Assange suggests WikiLeaks would publish material on Clinton's Republican rival Donald Trump, if it received appropriate material and judged it newsworthy.

Assange said Wikileaks has not yet received information on the campaigns of Trump, Stein or other candidates "that fulfills our stated editorial criteria."

___

6:55 a.m.

As voters cast their ballots for president, some are convinced, while others are holding their breath.

In Indianapolis, 50-year old homemaker Ranita Wires said she voted for Hillary Clinton because she trusts her, but said "this has been the worst," and she's "so glad it's over."

Craig Bernheimer voted for Donald Trump at his local polling station in Tulsa, Oklahoma early Tuesday, saying it has more to do with "what the other didn't bring."

New Mexico truck driver Richard Grasmick said he admired Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson and intended to vote for him, but grew disillusioned by Johnson's televised flubs on foreign affairs issues.

He said, "I wanted to go with Gary but he failed me." Grasmick voted for Donald Trump instead.

__

6:20 a.m.

Lines were long in some places, but few voters heading to the polls early Tuesday appeared to be encountering problems.

Presidential elections usually include sporadic voting problems, such as machines not working properly. Calls to Election Protection, a national voter helpline, included people reporting long lines as a result of machine problems in three precincts in Virginia. And election officials at a handful of precincts in Durham County, North Carolina, were using paper roll books after technical issues with computer check-in.

Ahead of the election, there was anxiety over whether voters would face problems. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump said the election was rigged and Democrats warned that Republicans were planning to intimidate voters. There were also concerns about hackers disrupting election systems.

__

5:45 a.m.

Donald Trump's eldest son says that his family will "respect the outcome" of a "fair election."

Donald Trump, Jr. told CNN's New Day Tuesday that he thinks his father "will remain involved somewhat" if he loses the election. He said he hopes that the energy surrounding his father's campaign "goes back to the people we are trying to fight for, the people who haven't had a voice in a long time."

He said, in retrospect, that "hopefully we shed some light on the process," and enabled people to speak their minds freely, "without being put in some basket, without being boxed in a corner."

___

5:40 a.m.

Women across the United States are wearing pantsuits Tuesday in a show of support for Hillary Clinton.

Many were inspired by a Facebook group called Pantsuit Nation that has more than 2 million members. Some are also wearing white in honor of the suffragists who wore white when they fought for women's voting rights in the early 1900s.

In Alexandria, Virginia, Heather O'Beirne Kelly says she's wearing a white pantsuit, inspired by the Facebook group and organized efforts to get women to wear white to vote.

New Yorker Denise Shull tried to buy a white pantsuit on Amazon, but they were sold out. She's wearing a black-and-white suit to support Clinton, but also to symbolize "women making progress."

__

5:35 a.m.

Hillary and Bill Clinton are voting in their hometown of Chappaqua New York.

The Clintons greeted supporters waiting outside the polling place after casting their ballots Tuesday morning.

Hillary Clinton said it was "the most humbling feeling" to vote "because so many people are counting on the outcome of this election."

Bill Clinton said he's eager to be a political spouse, joking that he had "15 years of practice."

___

5:30 a.m.

President Barack Obama is keeping up an Election Day tradition: a game of pick-up basketball with friends.

Obama arrived at the gymnasium at the Army's Fort McNair in the District of Columbia around 8 a.m. He wore dark, casual clothes and a baseball cap, and carried a pair of high-top athletic shoes. The White House didn't say who the president would be playing with.

On the day of his re-election in 2012, Obama's basketball teammates included former Chicago Bulls player Scottie Pippen.

Obama started the Election Day tradition during the 2008 presidential campaign.

The president has been campaigning aggressively to help elect fellow Democrat Hillary Clinton, including headlining get-out-the-vote rallies for her in three states on Monday.

___

5:15 a.m.

Tim Kaine is not letting the biggest election of his life get in the way of his Tuesday routine.

After voting at 6 a.m. and doing a round of national morning TV shows, Kaine met a group of friends for breakfast at the City Diner in Richmond.

Kaine and his friends try to meet every Tuesday at the diner, a few miles from his home.

The U.S. senator and former Virginia governor was greeted with cheers as he walked into the restaurant

___

5:10 a.m.

Donald Trump says the presidential campaign has been an "amazing process" that put him in touch with the unfulfilled aspirations of the American people.

Interviewed by phone Tuesday on "Fox and Friends," the Republican presidential nominee said he's seen "so many hopes and dreams that didn't happen, that could have been helped with proper leadership."

Trump says he "took a little heat" for bringing up "illegal immigration" from the day he launched his campaign, but "in the end it was the right thing to do."

Trump said his campaign is a "movement" and the American people are "incredible."

Asked whether he had any regrets, Trump said "sure, there's things I would have done different." He didn't name any.

___

5 a.m.

Eric Trump says that his father will concede the election if he loses and the results are "legit and fair."

In an Election Day interview with MSNBC's Morning Joe, Donald Trump's son said that "all we want is a fair fight, not just for this election but for all elections."

The Republican presidential nominee has repeatedly warned of a "rigged election," though there is no evidence of widespread fraud in the electoral system.

Eric Trump said, "we've seen states where a few thousand votes can make a difference."

Pressed by MSNBC anchors, he said of his father, "if he loses and it's legit and fair, and there's not obvious stuff out there then without question, yes," he would concede.

__

4:45 a.m.

Republican Donald Trump is expressing confidence on Election Day.

In a phone interview Tuesday morning on "Fox and Friends," the Republican presidential nominee said: "We're going to win a lot of states." But in a rare moment of uncertainty, he added: "Who knows what happens ultimately?"

If rival Hillary Clinton wins, Trump says he won't be looking back positively on a failed bid for the White House. He said: "If I don't win, I will consider it a tremendous waste of time, energy and money."

Trump said he's spent over $100 million of his own money on his campaign. Federal Election Commission reports, however, show he's more than $30 million short of that claim. According to fundraising records, Trump's investment so far is about $66 million.

____

4:30 a.m.

Democratic vice presidential nominee Tim Kaine says he and Hillary Clinton can clinch the White House if they win any one of the "checkmate" states.

In an interview with ABC's Good Morning America Tuesday, Kaine said the battleground states of North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Florida and Ohio each hold the key to a win for the Democratic running mates.

He said that Tuesday's election is a "history-making race" but he also warned against complacency, saying that "democracy always works better when people participate."

AP: Latest developments in Election 2016