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Letters, May 11

AT&T fake pine coming to SOU

On Monday I sent a letter to the Ashland Planning Department, objecting to the ugly proposed “105-foot stealth monopole designed to resemble a pine tree in a 450-square-foot area southeast of Raider Stadium” on the SOU campus for several reasons.

Yes, we need and are using cellphones plus the internet, but risk being exposed to more and more microwave radiation. Read the fine print in your cellphone’s disclaimer to learn more. Figure F of the AT&T application places it at the south end of the football field, near the facilities building and unfortunately near trees and across from a grade school. Since cellphone towers have been known to catch fire, this could make it a hazard. The Oregon Department of Forestry announced May 1 as the beginning of fire season and Jackson County is now in an extreme drought for this wildfire season. Most know how windy this area of the valley can be. Wind and fire equal disaster. Those concerned should contact the Ashland Planning Department in writing by 4:30 p.m. Monday, May 11, to 51 Winburn Way, Ashland, OR 97520.

Sally McKirgan

Ashland

Read the Voters’ Pamphlet

It’s all neatly laid out for us in the Voters’ Pamphlet, pages 15-16 and 17. Take a close read of it. The bonds for the fire station and library are retiring next month. Their tax is 23 cents/$1,000 of assessed value. This is a little more than the rate for the city bond: 21 cents/$1,000 of assessed value. The retiring bonds offset the new bond. Say your present tax on the retiring bonds is $10. If the bond measure passes, you will continue to be taxed nearly that same amount, $10, as with the retiring bonds. If the new bond fails, then your tax will go down $10. There will be no increase in your present taxes.

Carola Lacy

Ashland

Don’t swing at a wide pitch

U.S. Cellular Field is a sports center done right, providing a financial boon. However, why have the utility fee payers been charged for debt services?

The current plan for an aquatic center under a hot tin roof is not the best plan. Please take the time to review the East Oakland California Sports Center: its history, conception, planning, financing and build. Especially the quality provided for $18 million in 1999 which would be $28 million in 2020 dollars based on 54% inflation.

When one city councilor stated with regard to the utility fee and taxpayers, “They will grumble, but they will pay,” the councilor overlooked that the voters will vote.

Don’t swing at a wide pitch. Please vote no for fuzzy taxes and the $60 million dollar warehouse.

Bob Shand

Medford

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