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Mail Tribune 100

July 6, 1915

BASEBALL TRAIN IN COLLISION IN ASHLAND YARDS, 21 ARE INJURED

ASHLAND, July 6 — Twenty-one persons were injured, one probably fatally, when the section section of train No. 12, a baseball excursion train from Montague, Calif., on the Southern Pacific railroad, ran into two helper locomotives at Ashland early today. Loyal Taylor, a fireman, was so severely hurt that it is believed he cannot recover.

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Cause of the Collision

The collision was caused by the baseball special returning from Montague to Grants Pass crashing into two locomotives standing on the track ready to take out the Shasta limited, southbound. The Shasta engines were 2347, which has rear of tender badly smashed, and No. 2622, minus pilot, with tender slid forward. No. 3234, hauling in the baseball excursionists, had pilot carried away, headlight smashed and front of boiler caved in. One of the coaches (both of steel) had vestibule space demolished.

The injured were cared for by Dr. Boslough, company surgeon, at the sanitarium with the exception of engineer Livingston, who was removed to his home.

No cause is assigned for the accident. It happened in the east portion of the yards, where locomotives usually line up to take out outbound trains. Some of the rolling stock, especially engine 3234, looks as though it had been in collision with a Ford geared high.

Engineer Long was bringing in the excursion special and Engineer Livingston was on the first helper outbound with the Shasta.

Pernoll's Somersault

When the crash came, Jud Pernoll, pitcher of the Grants Pass team, was standing in the aisle talking. He was hurled to the end of the coach, turning an involuntary double somersault, sliding part of the way. His hat flew off and landed in the hat rack over the seat. "Al" Caster, pitcher of the Medford team, was asleep. When he awoke it was with both feet rammed through the back of a seat. Neither was injured.

John "Shine" Edwards had two ribs broken and teeth knocked out. Edwards did not realize the seriousness of his injuries until some time afterward. He was taken to the Ashland hospital and afterwards came to the depot for something to eat. It was then he discovered his loss and injury.