fb pixel

Log In


Reset Password

Mail Tribune 100

July 28, 1915

FISH LAKE DAM TO IMPROVE CITY WATER SUPPLY

To the editor:

Complying with your request that I give my views concerning the dam being erected at Fish Lake, I will say: Last week on our trip up there we found the Rogue River Canal company's camp to be in a very sanitary condition, located at a distance from our water supply, and with due precautions taken that no contamination may occur from them.

We also found that tributary to our water supply is about 200 acres of flat land a few inches above water line, which at present is grazing or camping, thus doing away with both these unsanitary features.

The lake is fed by springs of very cold water, and the company intends to have their outlet near the bottom of the dam. This will give us the coldest and purest of the water owing to the fact that the springs are on the bottom, and also that deep water remains colder.

Mr. Erickson, the forest supervisor of this district, was one of our party, and as the lake is in the forest reserve, he has signified his willingness to co-operate with us along the line of sanitation.

It is my opinion that this dam will be beneficial instead of detrimental to the city water supply.

F.V. MEDYNSKI

NEW SENTENCE FOR ASHLAND CLERK

ASHLAND, July 28. — Lyman D. McKee, formerly assistant postmaster here, was given a supplementary sentence of five days in the Multnomah County jail for malfeasance in office in connection with misappropriation of postal funds. This sentence came on the heels of a further one of 60 days, recently expired, and was decreed by Judge Bean of the federal court at Portland, july 26.

OREGONIAN HELD BY BERLIN POLICE

WASHINGTON, July 28 — The state department has begun an inquiry into the case of Harry l. Wilson of Oregon, a clerk in the American consulate in Berlin, arrested on the Danish frontier by German authorities while attempting to leave Germany without a passport.

While awaiting reports officials will not comment. Wilson has been in Berlin about five years.

Wilson's home is in Portland. Early last summer he took his daughter to Berlin to complete her musical education. When the war broke out, Wilson, who had become associated with American officials in the German capital, was appointed a clerk in the consulate.