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Mail Tribune 100

June 20, 1916

POISON OAK ENDS HIKING ASPIRATIONS

Poison oak, blisters, hunger and an inability to keep to the right trail combined to wreck the hiking aspirations of three young men who wandered footsore, ragged and unshaven, into Medford yesterday morning. The party, consisting of H. R. Russell, P. J. Maurer, both of Chehalis, Wash., and M. Harmon of San Francisco, left the latter city on the boat, bound for Eureka. There they disembarked and set out over the hills for the Rogue River valley, from which they intended to continue their hike to Seattle, Wash. Several times they lost the road, money went fast, and at Happy Camp they spent the last quarter in their tattered trousers.

"Hiking's all right," said Harmon, "but believe me, I felt better when father telegraphed the money to take me home."

PREACHER TO BE GREER'S OPPONENT

ASHLAND, June 20 — Petitions were circulated yesterday for Rev. M. C. Reed, as springs commissioner, an action which is the result of the recall movement launched against Bert R. Greer. Inasmuch as it takes only twenty-five signatures to place the name of Reed on the ballot, it is a foregone conclusion that he will be the nominee of those who seek to oust Greer.

Mr. Reed is a Methodist minister, having moved here from Portland some time ago. At present he is in charge of the Methodist church at Talent. He is also a member of the firm of Hodgson & Reed, a local real estate agency. Since residing here he has taken an active interest in civic matters as outlined and pushed towards development through commercial club and Business Men's association channels.

PROSPECT

Pat Walker, flume patrolman of the C. O. P. Co., was much surprised one day last week to discover a dead bobcat lying beneath the 2,300-volt line that runs along the flume. Investigation showed that the animal, which was an extra large one, had climbed one of the poles and come in contact with the aluminum conductors. Pat says the cat used poor judgment, considering the number of trees that were handy.