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Mail Tribune 100, March 10, 1919

The following news items were drawn from the archives of the Mail Tribune 100 years ago.

March 10, 1919

JURY REFUSES TO CINCH HENDRICKSON AS BOOTLEGGER

Considerable surprise was manifested in Justice Taylor’s court Saturday afternoon when after Prosecuting Attorney Roberts and those who heard the evidence against Roy Hendrickson, charged with selling a pint of whiskey to Aev Martin, thought that the state had made a sure case, the jury brought in a verdict of not guilty.

Night policeman Adams and Speed Cop McDonald testified that while they were in the police headquarters office Saturday night a week ago, Aev Martin entered and declared that he knew where he could buy a half pint of booze for $5. The officers thereupon furnished Martin with a marked $5 bill and he at once left to make the purchase. Fifteen minutes later Martin returned with the whiskey, and the officers hurried to a cigar store and placed Hendrickson under arrest and found the marked bill upon him. Martin told the officers that he was driven in a taxicab by Hendrickson to the Jackson street bridge where he paid over the money and was given the whiskey.

The testimony was corroborated in every particular by Martin on the witness stand, and H. R. Turpin, a taxi cab driver, who was subpoenaed by the state, and testified that he had taken the two men in his auto out to the bridge and back.

Adams and McDonald also testified that after his arrest Hendrickson admitted to them that he was representing another man in selling the whiskey, but refused to divulge his name.

On the witness stand Hendrickson made a complete denial of having sold the whiskey to Martin, and also denied the other allegations made, His attorney, Rawles Moore, placed H. C. Garnett and “Toggery Bill” on the witness stand and these two men declared that Aev Martin’s reputation for veracity was worthless. The attorney also brought out the fact that Martin had been sentenced to jail for non-support of his family. Ben and J. L. Gentry, cousins of Hendrickson, testified that they had been with him a large part of Saturday night and saw nor heard nothing of the alleged booze transaction. L. O. Coggins, also testified that he had taken a walk with Hendrickson that night an neither saw or heard of the booze affair.

The jury which returned the verdict was composed of Harry Lofland, C. J. Haas, J. W. Hockersmith, James Bolling, I. D. Bingham and Ernest White.

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