fb pixel

Log In


Reset Password

Mail Tribune 100, April 25, 1919

The following news items were drawn from the archives of the Mail Tribune 100 years ago.

April 25, 1919

TAKE SATURDAY OFF AND PUT THE LOAN OVER

A wonderful crop of alfalfa, grain, grass, fruit and confidence is developing in the Rogue river valley, and everybody is busy and hustling. One day off to replenish supplies, one day off to encourage merchants with patronage on Saturday, one day off to fulfill the highest duty of patriotism by visiting your banker and investing in Victory Liberty loan bonds tomorrow, Saturday, will make a fitting end to a busy week. Do not fail in this duty to your country, for the men in charge of this federal district are purposely favoring the small investor, the man who most cheerfully loans his all to the government to secure a permanent peace.

You have not been annoyed by solicitors to any extent, because all our citizens have been too busy to obey the call to solicit. Isn’t this a great thing to be thankful for in this valley — everybody too busy to ask his neighbor to answer the government’s call for workers? Voluntary subscriptions to the Victory loan in the same ration today and tomorrow, Saturday, bid fair to put this county over the top during the first week of the drive, and they will put us over if our friends from the rural districts will take the day off and they and their friends visit the banks and buy the limit of Victory Liberty bonds. We hope to see tomorrow one of the greatest crowds ever in Medford on Saturday to finish this work so well begun.

We want to drop a hint to the effect that “Us Cow Counties” of Oregon are making a wonderful showing in the Victory Liberty loan drive, and have Portland on the run to maintain her prestige. Something is going to drop in Portland tomorrow also, however, and we will all join in the Victory shouting when the state again goes over the top among the leaders.

It is only the one day off to finish the business and then back to our work.

W. N. CAMPBELL, County Chairman.

News from 100 years ago