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Mail Tribune 100, Aug. 20, 1920

The following news items were drawn from the archives of the Mail Tribune 100 years ago.

Aug. 20, 1920

ANCIENT LAKE TO BE UTILIZED FOR WATER RESERVOIR

Ashland, Aug. 20. — Prospectively, the bed of an ancient lake on the heights above Ashland canyon may be utilized for reservoir purposes to augment the city water supply. The area is an extensive one, nature having supplied the retaining walls in a great measure, leaving the exit to be dammed, if this project is decided upon. It is not planned to pipe the water from this reserve, but simply to use it for storage, the excess to find its way to the intakes proper lower down, as need may imply through a system of spillways and gates. The site is not really on Mount Ashland, but further to the west, on the divide between Ashland and Wagner peaks. In reaching it one leaves the main trail near Grobble’s cabin, turning to the right.

E. F. Smith, Robert Casey and Charley King have returned from an eight-day prospecting tour in that locality, their mission in behalf of the city being to look over available sites, do some actual prospecting as to soil, rock formation, etc., and report accordingly.

Other sites were investigated, notably one above Lory’s cabin, but the lake bed project is being mentioned as the most possible and also affording the greater supply, with a minimum of excavation. The drains, however, wherever located, would be formidable structures necessarily in line with extensive reservoir construction.

This particular site was examined some time ago, but this season the demand for more water has become so insistent that the city authorities have concluded something has to be done in the premises.

In the meantime the city engineer is again investigating the situation, preliminary to a decision as to what project to recommend as the better one among the member suggested. Whatever the plan, the expense involved will be considerable, and the idea is prevalent that the present city administration hesitates as to assuming the responsibility, preferring to shift it upon the shoulders of their successors.

Distance is lending enchantment to theoretical projects, as may be inferred from the fact that a correspondent in local papers is championing the plan of bringing water from Buck Lake, over mountain and valley forty miles away.

News from 100 years ago