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Mail Tribune 100, Feb. 18, 1921

The following news items were drawn from the archives of the Mail Tribune 100 years ago.

Feb. 18, 1921

SANDWICH BREAKS HUNGER STRIKE

Arnold R. Carol, held in the county jail for auto theft, and who went on a hunger strike a week ago, relented Thursday night, and ate a ham sandwich, according to County Physician Holt, who visited the youth in his cell, and talked to him, and examined his physical condition. Carol is kept in a cell by himself, and has stated to weaken in his threat “to die before going to prison.” His fellow prisoners have also endeavored to talk him out of his starving campaign.

THE SCREEN

Baby Settles Family Row by the Telephone

Babies have been known to settle all kinds of domestic mixups, but for the first time in the history of screendom was one employed to patch up a marital misunderstanding and banish a “family skeleton” by means of the telephone in Norma Talmadge’s latest Associated First National release, “The Branded Woman,” exhibited at the Page theatre this week. Perhaps it will be the wireless next. Anyway this photoplay represents the best cinema effort made thus far by Norma Talmadge.

LOCAL AND PERSONAL

The attention of all owners and drivers of cars is called to the fact that the new ordinance prohibiting parking of cars in front of entrances of theaters or other places of amusement is in force, and the penalty for violation hereof is a fine of $10. This warning is timely in view of the fact that especially large audiences will attend the basketball game Saturday night at the Natatorium, the Kolb and Dill performance at the Page Sunday night and the Elks minstrels next Monday and Tuesday nights at the Page. The council has given the police strict instructions for the enforcement of the ordinance.

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Are you still bearing in mind that this is prune week and doing your part towards decreasing Oregon’s immense surplus prune crop?

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The medical profession have a code of ethics which taboos advertising but in many districts where the winter roads are difficult the fortunate doctors who own new Buicks carry a local line “Dr. _____ is driving a new Buick Six,” and when you come to think of it, isn’t it good advertising? Wouldn’t you rather depend on the promptness of the doctor who was coming in a Buick than take chances on less dependable transportation?

— Alissa Corman;acorman@rosebudmedia.com

News from 100 years ago