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Mail Tribune 100, June 25, 1921

The following news items were drawn from the archives of the Mail Tribune 100 years ago

June 25, 1921

NEW DIRECTORS TRIGONIA WELL, DOWN 1,300 FEET

The Trigonia well is now at approximately 1,300 feet. The drill for the last 25 feet has been in hard black lime, with an occasional break of thin stratas of slate. The gas pressure appears to be increasing, and there is a constant show of good live oil.

The well had a large number of visitors during the week, all of them were enthusiastic over the showings of oil and gas. The crew will not work Sunday.

As previously announced, the stockholders election for board of directors took place the 20th inst., and re-elected the old members, and added 4 more, making a total of 11 in all.

FIRE LOSSES IN JACKSON COUNTY ARE ANNOUNCED

The state fire marshal has made a report on the fires in Jackson County the last year. There were 90 fires, with insurance risks at $303,359.70 and insurance losses paid amounted to $64,667.30. The causes of the fires are listed: 32 to unknown causes, 10 to overheated stoves, chimneys, and boilers, 15 to exposure, 8 to careless smokers, one incendiary, and 12 to open fires, ashes, and petroleum or its products. Of the structures afire 50 were dwellings, and the remainder were stores of building used for mercantile purposes.

STUNT AVIATOR ASHLAND, JULY 4TH, A MARVEL

One of the sensational features of the Jackson County parade and celebration on the Fourth at Ashland will be the flying exhibition to be give by Aviator Clyde E. Pangborn, whose home is in San Diego. He will fly over the parade in the morning and throw flowers out of his plane upon the crowd below. In the afternoon he will do a number of stunts over the baseball field. Pangborn claims to do all the stunts that can be done on an aeroplane, including walking on the winds and hanging by the landing gear and says he has done more stunt flying than any other aviator in California. Last year he was hurt at Coronado Beach while changing from an aeroplane to an auto going 80 miles an hour, and rolled for 60 feet on the beach.

— Alissa Corman; acorman@rosebudmedia.com