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Mail Tribune 100, Sept. 12, 1921

The following news items were drawn from the archives of the Mail Tribune 100 years ago

Sept. 12, 1921

CROWDED SCHOOLS SHOW MEDFORD IS GROWING FAST

The opening of the public schools today plainly demonstrates that Medford has a much larger population than a year ago. There were 50 more pupils in the grade schools today than on the opening day a year ago, and 30 more in the high school than on opening day last year. These increases over lat year are expected to be augmented in both grade and high schools inside of a week or so when all the pupils who were prevented for one reason or another from attending today have entered.

The total attendance of today in the grade schools was 993, and in the high school 335. The grade attendance was divided as follows: Washington, 420; Lincoln, 312; Roosevelt, 137; and Jackson, 124.

However, although the total of grade students is larger than last year, Washington has 20 less and Lincoln 15 less.

Nevertheless, Superintendent Smith and the school board have encountered a serious dilemma in the crushing attendance in the third and fourth grades of Washington school. It so happens that while the total attendance at this school is 20 less than last year, so many families have concentrated in the Washington school confines since last year with children of the third and fourth grade age that their coming today simply overwhelmed those grades. In one room alone 73 of them were herded.

Unless the superintendent and board find some way to relieve this congestion by transfers to other grade schools, which at present seems hardly possible, the board must provide a portable school room for these grades to be stationed in Washington school yard, which would necessitate the hiring of an extra teacher.

START CAMPAIGN TO ENFORCE LAW ON TRUCK LOADS

T. A. Rafferty, chief field deputy of the state motor vehicle division, and two of the deputies, Joe J. McMahon and H. L. Griffith, are in the city and vicinity for several days to enforce the state law about overloading of motor trucks and governing the speed of the same. Armed with a set of loadometers, which are mechanical contrivances for accurately measuring the weight of a truck load, they are busy at work. The work is mostly educational just now, as the legal load a truck can carry seems generally misunderstood, and wherever they find an overloaded truck, they issue a warning to the diver. Following this short warning period, every violator found thereafter will be arrested and prosecuted.

— Alissa Corman; acorman@rosebudmedia.com