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Mail Tribune 100, March 6, 1922

News from 100 years ago
The following news items were drawn from the archives of the Mail Tribune 100 years ago

March 6, 1922

LOCAL AUTHOR WINS O. HENRY PRIZE AWARD

Edison Marshall’s ‘The Heart of Little Shikara’ Declared Best Short Story Published in America in 1921—Highest Literary Honor.

The distinction of having written the best short story published, by an American in the country during 1921 belongs to Edison Marshall of Medford, who received official notice of the award today in the following letter:

Dear Mr. Marshall,

As chairman of the committee of award, I have particular pleasure in writing you this letter.

Your story, “The Heart of Little Shikara” has won the first prize, or $500, offered by the Society of Arts and Sciences for the best short story written by an American and published in America in the year 1921.

It is the custom of the society to hold annually a dinner in memory of O. Henry. The prizes are preferably awarded at this dinner and those who receive them are invited to speak. May we expect you to join us and to receive the award in person?

The dinner this year will be held, in all probability, in the week of March 20, at the Hotel Astor.

I should value a telegram fro you (sent collect) stating whether we may hope for your presence with us. If so, I will send you the exact date and place of the dinner.

Congratulating you, I am faithfully yours,

Blanche Colton Williams, Chairman...

Society of Arts and Sciences, of New York, consisting of all artists and scientists of great renown in the country, give every year, as a memorial to O. Henry, a prize of $500 to the best story written by an American during the year, and $250 for second prize. The prize stories, as well as a few more from which the final selection is made, are published every year in a volume, “Prize Stories of 1919,” 1920, etc.

...In the years 1916 and 1917, Marshall was presented with “Roll of Honor” stories, supposed to have permanent literary value. In 1919 he was included in the prize volume for the first time, with “The Elephant Remembers,” but did not win a prize. In 1920 the committee said of his work:

“Edison Marshall, represented in 1919 volume, by ‘The Elephant Remembers,’ has written the epic of Brother Bill the Elk.” In spite of its length, some fifteen thousand words, the committee was mightily tempted to request if for publication. Its western author known the animals in their native lairs.”

The prize story, “The Heart of Little Shikara,” was laid in India, and was published in Everybodys, January, 1921.

— Alissa Corman; acorman@rosebudmedia.com