fb pixel

Log In


Reset Password

Mail Tribune 100, June 23, 1922

News from 100 years ago
The following news items were drawn from the archives of the Mail Tribune 100 years ago

June 23, 1922

REPORT TOURISTS AT ASHLAND AUTO CAMP APPROVE PAY SYSTEM

J. H. Doran, the caretaker of the Ashland automobile camp grounds says that he finds the sentiment very strong among the tourists in favor of the standardized pay camp over the free ones and that the number who object to pay is exceedingly small against those who show a preference to the charge being made.

Ashland has a standardized camp with the privilege of a ten day stay. The first two days a charge of 50c per day is made, and additional days at the rate of 25c per day. Since May 22, the day upon which they began charge, 925 cars were registered up to last night. One-third of the cars stay the second day and longer, so that the approximate receipts for the past two months in round figures are $616.

Wm. Davis, the caretaker of the Medford automobile camp grounds reports that he has registered 538 cars since March 20, and that approximately one out of every six cars stay the second day and longer. If Medford would have been in position to offer the tourists a standardized service this season, the income up to this time would have been approximately $315.

Because the Medford camp lacks the conveniences of a standardized camp the tourists are not attracted here, nor are they anxious to stop any longer than necessary. Valuable data is being secured this year in both Ashland and Medford camps which will undoubtedly influence the citizens of Medford in making their camp a source of income instead of an expense to the tax payers.

CLOSED SEASON ON SLASHING FIRES

H. M. Bowser, district fire warden, announces that from June 1, until October 1, is closed fire season, and that in order to burn slashings or to start other similar fires one must have a permit.

These permits may be obtained from any fire warden or from the forest service office in the federal building in this city.

In some of the national forests of the country, it has become necessary to secure a permit before even building a camp fire.

— Alissa Corman; acorman@rosebudmedia.com