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Mail Tribune 100, Aug. 5, 1922

News from 100 years ago
The following news items were drawn from the archives of the Mail Tribune 100 years ago

Aug. 5, 1922

JULY VERY HOT, MERCURY SOARED TO 108 THE 2ND

The outstanding feature of the July official weather report is that it was one of the hottest months in Medford and vicinity for many years with a mean maximum of 96 degrees. The hottest day of the month was 108 degrees on July 2. The mean minimum was 53.3 degrees, the minimum was 44 on the 23rd, and the mean was 74.7.

The first week of July was especially warm with the following maximum temperatures: First, 100; second, 108; third, 105; fourth, 100; fifth, 101; sixth, 104; seventh, 99. The second week the maximum temperatures ranged from 91 to 100 degrees. In fact, the whole month was hot.

The mean maximum for July for the past six years was as follows: 1921, 90.7; 1920, 89.5; 1919, 94; 1918, 88.6; 1917, 94.9; 1916, 84.

The record hottest days in recent years was 109 degrees on August 13th, 1920.

Another feature of last month’s weather is that not a drop of rain fell. Twenty-three days were clear, six partly cloudy, and two cloudy.

HANGAR TENTS FOR EXHIBITS AT FAIR

Fair board directors are congratulating themselves upon the purchase some time ago at a nominal figure of several large hangar tents. The indications are now that the tents will have to be used in some departments to house the overflow exhibits. The directors are averse to using the tents except in an emergency but purchased them in order to provide against possibility of overflow exhibitions, which now seems likely in one or two departments.

The tents will make ideal display space, their shape readily adapting them to the purpose. By fronting two of the tents a canvas-enclosed space of 108 feet by 54 feet is secured making a fine exhibition pavilion. Four of these pavilions will be available if necessity arises and the accommodations they will provide will guarantee ample exhibition space even though the entries exceed the highest expectations of the Jackson County fair board.

— Alissa Corman; acorman@rosebudmedia.com