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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Logging will damage economyLogging in Mike's Gulch roadless area will cause significant damage to our future economy. Here is why.

Mike's Gulch is in the Highway 199 travel corridor, the most promising tourism development route on the West Coast of America. This represents an economic future worth of millions of dollars annually to the economies of Oregon and California.

Mike's Gulch is significant for astounding transformations between plant communities that are best seen from the T.J. Howell Botanical Drive, the most scenic drive along the Highway 199 corridor. This drive and its features, especially those seen in Mike's Gulch, give Oregon a unique marketing identity. Unique marketing identities set us apart from all other travel destinations on the West Coast and make southwest Oregon and our partners in California more marketable nationally and globally. This unique identity represents many business development opportunities and the cash flow to keep those businesses open for the lifetime of the merchant and employees.

Logging in Mike's Gulch will destroy this unique marketing identity and the opportunity it gives us to create a sustainable and diversified economic future with all businesses, timber and non-timber, having an equal opportunity to earn an income from our public lands. — --

Commercializing the flagWith Independence Day upon us, it seems that our flag has tragically become a symbol of our national differences rather than our union. I love my flag and hate to see it abused.

For nearly 30 years I served my country, first as an artillery officer and later as a civilian Cold War warrior in the Defense Department. Returning from a long overseas deployment, I wept at the sight of Old Glory flying above Dulles Airport. On the Fourth, Veterans Day and other holidays I faithfully display my flags.

Recently, there has been much ado about flag abuse. For me using the flag as a form of commercial advertising is the single most prevalent form of flag abuse in this country and the most offensive. After that, using the flag as a mere decoration really gets up my nose.

Now don't get me wrong. I don't care for flag-burning either, but burning is a rare occurrence and at least it has the merit of being the prescribed method of disposing of unserviceable flags. At best these degrading uses of the flag are in extraordinarily bad taste! &

8212; Don Morris, Ashland

Unwelcome intrudersIn response to Cindy Ward's letter of July 1: The atrocity committed against Native American Indians is a separate issue. Who puts food on my table? The farmers that grow it, the laborers that pick it, the truckers that haul it, the distributors that distribute it and the stores that sell it, i.e., people in the millions are involved in putting food on everyone's table.

As to going back to where I came from, I came from my mother's womb. I was born in America thus am a Native American. I am home. I stole nothing. "Illegal immigrants" are unwelcome intruders, not "legal immigrants." Do not lump them together. "Illegal immigrants" come from many countries, not only Mexico. "Illegal immigrant" workers are considered above (outside) the touted rule of law by the authorities. Authorities consider "illegal immigrant workers" not equal to, but superior to, natural born, naturalized citizen, and legal immigrant workers.

What makes "illegal immigrant workers" superior? "Illegal immigrant workers" are required to work for less money, are required to meet "unreasonable" productivity demands and cannot complain about these unfair labor practices. This is nothing but slavery. Slavery and those involved are unwelcome intruders in the U.S.A. &

173;-- Randall Hale, Medford