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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Regarding the June 8 front page Bear Creek article headlined "A thirst for water."

The same thing has been happening in the Upper Rogue Trail Creek for decades, but ODFW or NOAA Fisheries do nothing about it. Now that it's Bear Creek, it's "news." That shows how worthless the Endangered Species Act is with no enforcement.

Also, ODFW won't allow fish salvage from Trail Creek except from "isolated pools" — i.e., no water in or out. — Fred Fleetwood, Trail

Regarding Christopher Martin's story on hydrogen fuel cells in the June 7 Mail Tribune: There is no source of elemental hydrogen on the Earth. All the world's hydrogen is combined with oxygen as water, or with carbon as oil.

Producing a pound of hydrogen gas from water by electrolysis requires more energy from other sources than is generated by reacting a pound of hydrogen in a fuel cell, because of process inefficiencies. Thus, any source of energy that could be used to generate hydrogen would be more efficiently used, for example, to charge batteries.

Considering the problems of storing and handling hydrogen, the hydrogen fuel cell is likely to be used only for specialized applications. — Desmond R. Armstrong, Jacksonville

"Cosmos: A Space-Time Odyssey" on Sunday nights is rated 9.5/10 by viewers; only one other TV series has come close to that distinction. Past episodes can be seen at www.cosmosontv.com. For anyone interested in climate change (everyone needs to be), the most recent episode, "The World Set Free," is a well-reasoned, understandable and riveting presentation of why we need to be extremely concerned — arguably beyond all other concerns — about upsetting the delicate balance of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere by burning fossil fuels. — Ted Gibbs, Ashland

"In for a penny, in for a pound," seems to be the giddy chorus at the Medford City Council as they place a cherry on top of their multi-million bond for public safety. They now chortle with glee and give the fire department $260,000 for new radios.

What's worse, the justification reads like a blurb straight out of the manufacturer's brochure. Did the MT reporter mean to simply copy down the fire laddies' hackneyed supplications and skirt any concerns for the citizenry? Firefighters are great gals and guys, but such an expenditure for vague "improved communications" merits examination. — Hubert Smith, Jacksonville