fb pixel

Log In


Reset Password

November 2009

36
View all photos
This is what our visitors get to see first thing when coming in at the new S. interchange and then they get to see Skinners nice big red and white tent - whats up??? I took other pictures but it looks like I can only attach one. - Richard Oliveria
Not only the river, but the trees are full of life. All this and so much more, above Gold Ray dam. - Matthew Wright
This is what our visitors get to see first thing when coming in at the new S. interchange and then they get to see Skinners nice big red and white tent - whats up??? I took other pictures but it looks like I can only attach one. - Richard Oliveria
This is what our visitors get to see first thing when coming in at the new S. interchange and then they get to see Skinners nice big red and white tent - whats up??? I took other pictures but it looks like I can only attach one. - Richard Oliveria
Osprey, flying above Gold Ray dam, looking for the next meal. As the Osprey have nested above Gold Ray dam, they too are part of the wildlife community that lives and thrives at the dam. - Matthew Wright
Here,is a part of our History. A part of Jackson County that should never disapear. This is the powerhouse roof top, at Gold Ray Dam. - Matthew Wright
Gold Ray dam at night. Tranquility. A way of life. A place to get away from the hectic race of life. A place of contemplation. When was the last time you visited Gold Ray dam? - Matthew Wright
About October 20th at lunch time I have been walking around where I work at the VASORCC, thats the Veterans Admin in White City. This is one of 100 photos that I have in a colection to help me get through the winter blues. - Mary Durham
After seeing the article in today's paper, I decided to post a few pictures of why we love Gold Ray Dam and the wetlands it creates. I understand Mr Schock's feelings of having it gone. It is one of our favorite spots as photographers to go and capture the beauty of nature. If you look on Rogue Current I'm sure you'll find many other pictures as well. - Kathy Hoevet
Some of the wildlife found at Gold Ray dam. It is our responsibility to ensure future generations will enjoy this wildlife. - Matthew Wright
After seeing the article in today's paper, I decided to post a few pictures of why we love Gold Ray Dam and the wetlands it creates. I understand Mr Schock's feelings of having it gone. It is one of our favorite spots as photographers to go and capture the beauty of nature. If you look on Rogue Current I'm sure you'll find many other pictures as well. - Kathy Hoevet
The blue heron, relying upon your support of nonremoval of the Gold Ray Dam. Do your part in protecting wildlife for future generations. - Matthew Wright
Where will birds like this, and many other species go, if we remove their homes? - Matthew Wright
After seeing the article in today's paper, I decided to post a few pictures of why we love Gold Ray Dam and the wetlands it creates. I understand Mr Schock's feelings of having it gone. It is one of our favorite spots as photographers to go and capture the beauty of nature. If you look on Rogue Current I'm sure you'll find many other pictures as well. - Kathy Hoevet
My wife Nancy Smith is from Vermont, and I am from Boston. We live in Hawaii, and in October we visited the Medford area. We were thrilled to see the fall foliage -- it reminded us of New England. This shot was taken in Jacksonville on October 16. - Nelson Smith
After seeing the article in today's paper, I decided to post a few pictures of why we love Gold Ray Dam and the wetlands it creates. I understand Mr Schock's feelings of having it gone. It is one of our favorite spots as photographers to go and capture the beauty of nature. If you look on Rogue Current I'm sure you'll find many other pictures as well. - Kathy Hoevet
Brittany Blacksmith, Karen Jokumsen, Maci Jokumsen, Brooke Blacksmith, Jakob Blacksmith, Teigan jokumsen, and in front Emily Blacksmith. Getting ready to run in the Turkey Trot. - Wendy Blacksmith
The Blue Heron. Alive and thriving at the Gold Ray dam. Another member of the community of wildlife that relies on Gold Ray for it's life-cycle. - Matthew Wright
What if your Grandchild turned to you one day and said, 'You mean, you really were a part in protecting all of this'? - Matthew Wright
After seeing the article in today's paper, I decided to post a few pictures of why we love Gold Ray Dam and the wetlands it creates. I understand Mr Schock's feelings of having it gone. It is one of our favorite spots as photographers to go and capture the beauty of nature. If you look on Rogue Current I'm sure you'll find many other pictures as well. - Kathy Hoevet
Photo taken at upper Lithia Park pond. Creek feeds the pond. This was taken around 2:30pm on 11-4-09. - Gene Hollingsworth
11-1@5pm This photo was taken at a friends house in Wimer, 10miles from Rogue River. A hugh pine tree stood next to a much smaller maple.Everyone asks about the blue color of the cones,I explain that most of the time when you look at somthing, you don't pay attention to the detail as much as looking at a photo where your eye takes more time to notice the detail. - Mary Durham
Lithia Loop Marathon coming down BTI 11/7/09 - Deborah Holden
Life, real life at Gold Ray Dam. - Matthew Wright
This is our 5 year old English Bulldog she loves napping but they have been really long naps now thats its getting colder outside - William Wolfe
Gold Ray dam at dusk. An amazing habitat for wildlife, plant species and those that venture out and explore this amazing place. Let's all do our part to preserve this for future generations. - Matthew Wright
This is a series of photos from the Gold Ray Dam. This is home to many species of wildlife along with plant life. We created the dam, and the home these animals and plants now have. It would be ethically wrong to remove the dam. - Matthew Wright
Gold Ray Dam. Standing, holding back the waters of life, community, and the hearts of those that have came to love this place. The removal of this dam would become a black eye for Jackson County residents. Far worse than that, it would destroy the home and life-cycle of many of the animals and plant species that rely on this life-giving body of water. Gold Ray Dam. - Matthew Wright
The waters above Gold Ray Dam. Home to many species of wildlife and animal life. Do you really want to see this all go away? - Matthew Wright
Gold Ray dam waters. Our chance to stop the removal of a life cycle. - Matthew Wright
After seeing the article in today's paper, I decided to post a few pictures of why we love Gold Ray Dam and the wetlands it creates. I understand Mr Schock's feelings of having it gone. It is one of our favorite spots as photographers to go and capture the beauty of nature. If you look on Rogue Current I'm sure you'll find many other pictures as well. - Kathy Hoevet
Happy to be with the family. - William Wolfe
This was at the 09 Tulelake Motorcycle Rally July 09 - William Wolfe
Another photo at the VASORCC in White City, this is from an ornamental pear tree, taken around 10-15 during a rain storm. This is another photo to help get me through the Winter. - Mary Durham
Life above Gold Ray depends on us all to take a step forward to stop the removal of the dam. Time is short. Please, do your part! - Matthew Wright
Though these are small, they are part of the life-cycle living, thriving above Gold Ray dam. - Matthew Wright