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Photos of Monday's solar eclipse from around the country

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The statue of Harry Truman on Independence Square at the time of the eclipse's totality Monday. [David M. Rainey/Special to The Examiner]
Solar eclipse totality as seen from Blue Springs at about 1:08 p.m. [Photo courtesy of city of Blue Springs]
Luis Ramirez, 11, left, Kurtis Vickers, 10, Fabian Mena, 10, and Diego Caballero,10, look at the partial eclipse through homemade pinhole viewers at the San Joaquin County Office of Education in Stockton. [CLIFFORD OTO/THE RECORD]
A Jackson County Sheriff's Office deputy takes in the eclipse at Truman Courthouse on the Independence Square Monday. [David M. Rainey/Special to The Examiner]
A multi-family gathering as totality approaches at George Owens Nature Park in Independence. [Mike Genet/The Examiner]
Spectators at the Independence Square view the start of the partial eclipse. [David M. Rainey/Special to The Examiner]
Solar eclipse totality as seen from Blue Springs at about 1:08 p.m. [Photo courtesy of city of Blue Springs]
Hundreds turned out Aug. 21 at an eclipse-viewing party held at Penn State Behrend in Harborcreek Township, which featured telescopes fitted with solar filters available for viewing the partial eclipse. [CHRISTOPHER MILLETTE/ERIE TIMES-NEWS]
Christopher Rockwell of Battle Creek, MI, waits in his hammock for the total solar eclipse at Evergreen Park in Carbondale, Ill. Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. Rockwell ended up sleeping in his car last night after arriving after dark and deciding that hunting around the national park that late wasn't a good idea. [Ted Schurter/The State Journal-Register]
Sporting an eclipse shirt to mark the total solar eclipse, legendary southern Illinois bluesman Tawl Pawl and Slappin Henry Blue perform at P.K.'s on The Strip Sunday, Aug 20, 2017. [Ted Schurter/The State Journal-Register]
Abby Johnson, 14, of Meadville, views the eclipse through solar glasses Aug. 21 at an eclipse-viewing party held at Penn State Behrend in Harborcreek Township. Hundreds turned out for the event, which featured telescopes fitted with solar filters available for viewing the partial eclipse. [CHRISTOPHER MILLETTE/ERIE TIMES-NEWS]
Spectators at the Independence Square view the start of the partial eclipse. [David M. Rainey/Special to The Examiner]
A spectator at the Independence Square views the start of the partial eclipse. [David M. Rainey/Special to The Examiner]
Swaraj Patel, 18, takes a photo of the eclipse on his smartphone through a pair of solar glasses Aug. 21 at an eclipse-viewing party held at Penn State Behrend in Harborcreek Township. Patel is a sophomore computer engineering student from India. Hundreds turned out for the event at Behrend, which featured telescopes fitted with solar filters available for viewing the partial eclipse. [CHRISTOPHER MILLETTE/ERIE TIMES-NEWS]
More than 200 plus people joined the Spartanburg Photography Guild to image the Eclipse at the Sandy Springs Fire Department in Laurens. People from all over the country joined the guild to watch and take photos of the Eclipse. These of the Eclipse were taken by Edward Overstreet of Spartanburg.[EDWARD OVERSTREET/for the SPARTANBURG HERALD-JOURNAL]
Traffic slows down on Pleasant Hill Road in Carbondale as people arrive to view the total solar eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. [Ted Schurter/The State Journal-Register]
The skies clear over the Independence Square in time for the eclipse. [David M. Rainey/Special to The Examiner]
Crowds emerge on the Independence Square after the rain stops priot to the eclipse Monday. [David M. Rainey/Special to The Examiner]
Clouds move past the crescent shape of the sun during the total solar eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. Skies cleared for eclipse watchers in Evergreen Park in Carbondale just in time to witness totality. [Ted Schurter/The State Journal-Register]
Nicole Mullaney, left, Devon King and Rocky Allen laugh as they pass the time waiting for customers in the beer garden at the Underground Barrel Room & Grill in downtown Carbondale Sunday, Aug. 20, 2017. 'It's not living up to the hype,' Allen said. 'It's been about thirty percent of what I expected.' [Ted Schurter/The State Journal-Register]
Denise Siebecker of Chicago shows off her new eclipse shirt as she visits with her husband and friends on The Strip in downtown Carbondale during eclipse weekend festivities Sunday, Aug. 20, 2017. [Ted Schurter/The State Journal-Register]
About 78% of the sun is covered by the moon at the peak of the partial eclipse over Stockton about 10:18 a.m. [CLIFFORD OTO/THE RECORD]
The Hammett family of Independence checks out the end of the partial eclipse before totality at George Owens Nature Park in Independence. [Mike Genet/The Examiner]
Lydia Chimenti of Erie photographs the eclipse with her smart phone Aug. 21 at an eclipse-viewing party held at Penn State Behrend in Harborcreek Township. Hundreds turned out for the event, which featured telescopes fitted with solar filters available for viewing the partial eclipse. [CHRISTOPHER MILLETTE/ERIE TIMES-NEWS]
Souman Chatz of Chicago, Ill., prepares his camera for the total solar eclipse at Evergreen Park in Carbondale, Ill., Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. [Ted Schurter/The State Journal-Register]
Students at Cordill-Mason Elementary in Blue Springs enjoying the eclipse and the drakness during totality. [Photo courtesy of Blue Springs School District]
A spectator at the Independence Square views the start of the partial eclipse. [David M. Rainey/Special to The Examiner]
Local nuns prepare for the eclipse at the Independence Square. [David M. Rainey/Special to The Examiner]
Thomas Kasper, left, Kyle Mohr and his brother Braden, relax while waiting for the solar eclipse in Giant City State Park Monday, Aug. 21, 2017 in Carbondale, Ill. The three, and another friend, drove overnight from Merrill, Wis., arriving at 1 a.m. [Rich Saal/The State Journal-Register]
Spectators at the Independence Square view the start of the partial eclipse. [David M. Rainey/Special to The Examiner]
The corona of the sun is visible during totality of the solar eclipse from Carbondale, Ill., Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. The corona is the outermost layer of the solar atmosphere. It appears as a halo around the sun during a total solar eclipse. According to NASA, the corona is made of a tenuous ionized gas called plasma, with temperatures up to many millions of degrees Fahrenheit. It is visible to the naked eye only during a total solar eclipse. [Ted Schurter/The State Journal-Register]
A view of the 'diamond' ring' just before the total eclipse from Independence. [John Howe/Special to The Examiner]
Former college roomates Alex Marson, left, and Cassim Shepard, along with Shepard's wife Heather McGhee, left, and her sister Shannon McGhee visit on a tiny pennisula of land that stretches into the Carbondale Reservoir as they wait for the total solar eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. Shepard said he's been waiting to view the eclipse since he saw a commercial for the Mitsubishi Eclipse as a nine-year-old that advertised the 2017 event. 'I thought the future would be here,' Shepard said, who also thought we'd be traveling in solar-powered vehicles to the moon. [Ted Schurter/The State Journal-Register]
Spectators at the Independence Square view the start of the partial eclipse. [David M. Rainey/Special to The Examiner]
The partial solar eclipse creates crescent-shaped light patches on the ground as light filters through the leaves of a tree at San Joaquin Delta College in Stockton. [CLIFFORD OTO/THE RECORD]
Tree leaves created pinholes through which renderings of the partial solar eclipse could be seen on a sidewalk Aug. 21 at an eclipse-viewing party held at Penn State Behrend in Harborcreek Township. Hundreds turned out for the event, which featured telescopes fitted with solar filters available for viewing the partial eclipse. [CHRISTOPHER MILLETTE/ERIE TIMES-NEWS]
Crowds begin to form at Independence Square as the skies clear prior to the start of the eclipse. [David M. Rainey/Special to The Examiner]
Checking out the partial eclipse at George Owens Nature Park in Independence. [Mike Genet/The Examiner]
More than 200 plus people joined the Spartanburg Photography Guild to image the Eclipse at the Sandy Springs Fire Department in Laurens. People from all over the country joined the guild to watch and take photos of the Eclipse. These of the Eclipse were taken by Edward Overstreet of Spartanburg.[EDWARD OVERSTREET/for the SPARTANBURG HERALD-JOURNAL]
A view of the total eclipse from Independence. [John Howe/Special to The Examiner]
Jamie Williams of Detroit, MI., sells commemorative eclipse shirts along The Strip in downtown during weekend festivities Sunday, Aug. 20, 2017. [Ted Schurter/The State Journal-Register]
Principal Monica Shane and students and Blue Hills Elementary enjoying the start of the eclipse. [Photo courtesy of Fort Osage School District]
The crowd builds at the Independence Square as the eclipse starts to take form. [David M. Rainey/Special to The Examiner]
More than 200 plus people joined the Spartanburg Photography Guild to image the Eclipse at the Sandy Springs Fire Department in Laurens. People from all over the country joined the guild to watch and take photos of the Eclipse. These of the Eclipse were taken by Edward Overstreet of Spartanburg.[EDWARD OVERSTREET/for the SPARTANBURG HERALD-JOURNAL]
Southern Illinois University Carbondale students Kyle Kruckeberg, left, and Olivia Hajnos inspect their new eclipse t-shirt after picking one up on The Strip Sunday, Aug. 20, 2017. [Ted Schurter/The State Journal-Register]
The statue of Harry Truman on Independence Square at the time of the eclipse's totality Monday. [David M. Rainey/Special to The Examiner]
Baily's Beads are visible as the solar eclipse approaches totality Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. The effect seen just before and just after totality when only a few points of sunlight are visible through valleys around the edge of the moon. [Ted Schurter/The State Journal-Register]
Spectators at the Independence Square view the eclipse at about 80 percent of totality. [David M. Rainey/Special to The Examiner]
Anticipation builds as spectators at the Independence Square view the start of the partial eclipse. [David M. Rainey/Special to The Examiner]
Janine Ford takes time out from her art class at Oak Park senior center to photograph the eclipse shadows on the garden walkway. [CALIXTRO ROMIAS/THE RECORD]
The partial solar eclipse viewed in the Erie region on Aug. 21 produced about 76 coverage of the sun, according to astronomers at Penn State Behrend in Harborcreek Township. Hundreds turned out for an eclipse-viewing party at Penn State Behrend, which featured telescopes fitted with solar filters available for viewing the partial eclipse. [CHRISTOPHER MILLETTE/ERIE TIMES-NEWS]
Leaves on a tree created pinholes through which renderings of the partial solar eclipse could be seen on a sidewalk Aug. 21 at an eclipse-viewing party held at Penn State Behrend in Harborcreek Township. Hundreds turned out for the event, which featured telescopes fitted with solar filters available for viewing the partial eclipse. [CHRISTOPHER MILLETTE/ERIE TIMES-NEWS]
Clouds begin to obscure the sun during the beginning of the total solar eclipse viewed from Evergreen Park in Carbondale, Ill., Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. [Ted Schurter/The State Journal-Register]
More than 200 plus people joined the Spartanburg Photography Guild to image the Eclipse at the Sandy Springs Fire Department in Laurens. People from all over the country joined the guild to watch and take photos of the Eclipse. These of the Eclipse were taken by Edward Overstreet of Spartanburg.[EDWARD OVERSTREET/for the SPARTANBURG HERALD-JOURNAL]
Spectators at the Independence Square view the start of the partial eclipse. [David M. Rainey/Special to The Examiner]
The diamond ring as totality ends in Blue Springs. [Photo courtesy of city of Blue Springs]
Shannon Fera of Meadville views the solar eclipse Aug. 21 at an eclipse-viewing party held at Penn State Behrend in Harborcreek Township. 'It's a rare phenomenon of nature,' said Fera. 'And we're lucky to be here for it.' Hundreds turned out for the event, which featured telescopes fitted with solar filters available for viewing the partial eclipse. [CHRISTOPHER MILLETTE/ERIE TIMES-NEWS]