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Beckham Jr. dodges serious injury in loss

CLEVELAND — Odell Beckham Jr. didn't point fingers or make accusations.

After possibly dodging a major injury, New York's flashy wide receiver calmly moved on.

No theatrics were necessary.

Beckham sprained his left ankle on a questionable hit in the first half of the Giants' 10-6 exhibition loss to the Cleveland Browns on Monday night.

After catching an 18-yard pass from Eli Manning in the first half, Beckham was undercut by Browns cornerback Briean Boddy-Calhoun, who drove his shoulder and helmet into the star receiver's left leg. Beckham's legs flipped into the air and he banged his head hard on the turf.

"I'm pretty concerned," Beckham said. "But I'll be all right."

The Giants (0-2) said Beckham only suffered a sprain, but the team will have further medical tests conducted Tuesday. One of the NFL's most electrifying playmakers, the 24-year-old Beckham caught 101 passes last season and recently said he wants to be the league's highest-paid player.

"It feels like a sprained ankle, a rolled ankle," Beckham said. "It feels like you know you hurt your ankle. That's how it feels."

Earlier, Beckham was visibly upset by what he thought was an unnecessary shot for a preseason game. He glared at Boddy-Calhoun as he limped off the field.

Beckham, who spent the second half in street clothes on the sideline and jogged to the locker room afterward, didn't call Boddy-Calhoun's hit dirty.

"I don't know, it's just football I guess, preseason," he said, shaking his head. "I'm not really the judge. It's just football in my opinion."

Browns coach Hue Jackson defended Boddy-Calhoun.

"I don't think any of our players try to do things maliciously," Jackson said. "It's tackle."

BOLDIN RETIRES: Anquan Boldin didn't decide overnight he was going to quit football in order to speak out against longstanding concerns over inequality in America.

The recent deadly and racially charged conflict in Charlottesville, Virginia, did, however, become the tipping point that caused Boldin to reassess his priorities and led to the Buffalo Bills receiver's decision to retire after 14 NFL seasons.

"I think anybody with any sense can see how divided we are as a country, and Charlottesville only magnified what we were already seeing," Boldin told The Associated Press by phone Monday.

He was disturbed by the hateful messages directed at African-Americans, Jewish people and the LGBT community during a rally involving neo-Nazis and other right-wing groups in which a counter-protester was killed and two Virginia state police officers died on Aug. 13.

"That's not the America that I want to live in," he said. "And I think the only way that this America changes is that we as a people stand up and change it."

Boldin spoke a day after abruptly informing the Bills he was retiring some two weeks after signing a one-year contract with a base salary of $1.75 million.

The NFL's 2015 Walter Payton Man of the Year, Boldin is no stranger to activism and humanitarian causes. He oversees the South Florida-based Q81 Foundation, which offers educational support for underprivileged children.

He has lobbied for criminal justice reform at the state and federal levels since his cousin was killed by a plain-clothes police officer along the side of a Florida highway in October 2015.

Difficult as it was to walk away from football, Boldin felt he could no longer stand silent on the sideline.

"There's not enough money in this world for me to continue to allow the things that are going on to continue to spread," the 36-year-old father of two boys said.

"I will not feel safe leaving this earth and having my kids have to live in the America that we have today."

Boldin ranks in the top four among active receivers with 1,076 catches, 13,779 yards receiving and 82 touchdowns receiving.

BRONCOS CHOOSE SIEMIAN: Trevor Siemian has been named the Denver Broncos' starting quarterback after beating out Paxton Lynch.

Siemian, a 2015 seventh-round draft pick out of Northwestern who won the starting job last year when he beat out veteran Mark Sanchez, quickly surged ahead of Lynch, a first-rounder in 2016 from Memphis, when training camp opened.

Lynch showed more comfort with the new scheme and coaching staff but still proved inadequate at decoding defenses while Siemian was steady and solid, if unspectacular.

New York wide receiver Odell Beckham (13) is tackled by Cleveland strong safety Briean Boddy-Calhoun in the first half Monday. [DAVID RICHARD/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]