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Davis and Cline Gallery

Davis and Cline Gallery, 525 A Street, Suite 1, is hosting an exhibit featuring the work of two artists through March 31.

Catharine Newell, widely recognized for her distinctive figurative work, examines the persistence of memory and the impact it has on relationships in a show titled "Being" at the Davis and Cline Gallery in March 2007. The show will open on March 2 at 5 p.m. and will close on March 31.

Newell's most recent body of work titled "Memory Notes" is a collection of small portraits made from kiln-formed Bullseye glass with powder details. Each beautifully rendered portrait is intimately, yet not specifically related to its neighbor and speaks of the personality, quirks, and particular characteristics of its subject, creating a sense of familiarity for the viewer. As a group they recall loose sketchpad sheets that have been wrinkled, rediscovered and then assembled in temporary order. The sensitivity of the drawing and the artist's mastery of the medium is further enhanced by the placement and grouping of the individual pieces.

Newell lectures, teaches and exhibits internationally. Most recently, her travels took her to Hong Kong, China and Australia in 2006. She was nominated for the Louis Comfort Tiffany Biennial Award in 2003, and her work was selected for New Glass Review 26 in 2005. Her work has recently been acquired for the permanent collections of the Swedish Hospital in Seattle, Bullseye Corporate Collection and the University of Miami Lowe Museum. Newell maintains a private studio in Portland, Oregon.

Marilyn Higginson's large and moody landscape paintings of Northwest Oregon will be exhibited at the Davis and Cline Gallery in March. The show, which opens on Friday March 2nd, will run for the whole month and will close on March 31st.

Higginson's paintings push horizon lines to extremes. Most of the paintings are full of sky, but the subject matter is always the ground. Soft transitional clouds or clear late afternoon skies create a stage-like setting for the more detailed landforms represented by thinly layered oil paint. These renderings are tightly defined moments in time and are both familiar from an experiential standpoint and unique in their execution and composition.

Higginson, who lives just west of Portland, Oregon, originally came from Palo Alto California and received her BFA from the University of Oregon.

For information call 482-2069 or see the Web site