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Art grant recipients will showcase their works at First Friday

Nearly two dozen Rogue Valley artists, winners of a record $70,000 in grants from the Haines & Friends Fund, will show off their creations in the Grand Ballroom of the Ashland Springs Hotel during Ashland’s June 7 First Friday art walk.

The event is from 5 to 8 p.m. at the high-rise hotel in downtown Ashland, and the artists will also showcase their work at the hotel from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, June 8. All artists will be present to talk to passersby about their creations and goals.

The fifth annual round of grants, mainly from Ashland lawyer-developer Matthew Haines, not only went to support paintings, sculptures, mosaic, photography, video, woodworking and other art but also for workshops, mentors, travel, art supplies and other forms of support for artists who would otherwise have to work for the basics of life.

Other significant donors were Wendy Seldon and Barry Thalden.

“I could not survive as an artist without my Haines grant. It allowed me to continue my work,” said mosaic ceramicist and concrete artist Karen Rycheck of Talent, who got a $2,850 grant to study with her mentor in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, focusing on cacti sculptures. She is one of the artists creating Talent’s pollinator garden and wall, using a previous Haines grant.

“It’s a wonderful asset that supports so many artists, projects and community work, and I’m super grateful for it,” says Painter Jenay Elder of Ashland. She used her $3,000 grant for oil paints and canvas “to help me produce tons” of still lifes, portraits and landscapes, and to get a business advisor to help build her marketing and career, she says.

James Condos of Grants Pass will be showing 22 colored-pencil collages, which were created with a $1,500 grant for high-quality art supplies, paper and framing.

“It enabled me to feel more positive about myself and my imagination so as to get more ideas for my art,” he said. The pictures come from stories of his life and include “Gypsy Highway,” a colorful depiction of a girl standing in front of her gypsy caravan.

Ashland Art Center’s Denise Baxter of Creative Solutions says, “There are very few opportunities for individual artists to apply for financial support, but this is one of the few that will fund a lathe or art supplies or gas to drive to a workshop and for many other purposes that give them the edge. Sometimes all you need is a little edge.”

The artists are:

James Condos, $2,500 individual grant for archival mat, frame, and U.V. glass to prepare for the exhibition and sale of 22 original pieces of artwork;

Jenay Elder, $3,000 individual grant for education in strategic business planning and for the purchase of materials for new works;

Daniel Elster, $3,500 individual grant- Toward the creation of a self-published photography book of wildlife;

David Gibb, $3,500 individual grant to purchase equipment and to print and exhibit a select group of landscape photography;

Amy Godard, $2,000 individual grant to assist in the creation of a body of ethnobotanical prints of local native plants;

Victoria Markham, $4,000 individual grant in support of a grief film that brings forth resources for people who have had a loved one die;

Micah Ofstedahl, $2,500 individual grant funding expenses associated with marketing artwork for exhibit outside of the local area;

Silvia Trujillo, $1,000 individual grant to purchase materials associated with creating large format impasto oil paintings;

Karen Rycheck, $2,850 individual grant to cover expenses related to attending an out-of-town mosaic and concrete art workshop;

Rick Evans, $2,750 individual grant for the creation of a quality sculpture studio with equipment to create public art installations;

Peter Van Fleet, $4,000 community grant to extend both studio and gallery exhibit space at The Bell House Gallery;

Tracy Knopf, $4,500 community grant to create a community mural with fifth- to eighth-grade classes from Lorna Byrne Elementary;

The Studio at Living Opportunities, $3,500 community grant to provide financial assistance for art workshops that benefit individuals who experience disabilities;

The Vision Books Project, $4,000 community grant in support of a group artist project that creates handcrafted journals for incarcerated youths and to orphanages in the Middle East and Africa;

Lisa Eldridge, $3,500 individual grant for the education and exploration of new types of atmospheric kiln-firing techniques;

Micah Lael, $3,500 individual grant for the creation of one extra-large (4-foot-by-3-foot) ballpoint pen drawing as part of the Faced Project, a series of fantastic portraits executed almost entirely in ballpoint pen;

Desmond Serratore, $2,000 individual grant to have artwork framed professionally for the exhibition of oil paintings of various dimensions;

Corbin Brashear, $3,500 community grant enabling Wild & Wooly Feltworks instruction to take place within the Three Rivers School District;

Art Presence Art Center, $4,000 community grant supporting the art workshops offered to adults and children through the community art center;

Jose Rivera, $2,500 individual grant allowing for travel to attend a workshop and the purchase of supplies for resulting art creations;

Denise Souza Finney, $2,000 individual grant for assistance in the building of an art work table and movable wall easel;

Tahiz Perezchica, $3,300 community grant to fund a film about mental health and suicide prevention amongst teenagers;

Pamela Ourshalimian, $1,000 individual grant to allow for the study of painting and to further work on a current series of paintings for eventual exhibit.

Courtesy photoThe fifth annual round of grants, mainly from Ashland lawyer-developer Matthew Haines, not only went to support paintings, sculptures, mosaic, photography, video, woodworking and other art but also for workshops, mentors, travel, art supplies and other forms of support for artists who would otherwise have to work for the basics of life.